Statistical First Release 192 - Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education in the United Kingdom

 

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HESA SFR 192

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27 June 2013

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HESA SFR 192

DESTINATIONS OF LEAVERS FROM HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE UNITED KINGDOM FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 2011/12

Introduction

This Statistical First Release (SFR) has been produced by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), in collaboration with statisticians from the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS), the Welsh Government (WG), the Scottish Government (SG) and the Department for Employment and Learning Northern Ireland (DEL(NI)). It has been released according to the arrangements approved by the UK Statistics Authority. It provides details of the destinations of UK and other European Union domiciled leavers from higher education (HE) who obtained qualifications in higher education institutions (HEIs) in the United Kingdom (UK), during the academic year 2011/12. The data presented draws on the new version of the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey introduced in 2011/12. 

Following a review of the DLHE survey and consultation with government departments, the HE sector and users of the data, the DLHE survey has been re-designed to collect richer information from leavers particularly regarding their activities on the survey date. Leavers now report all the activities that they are undertaking on the census date and then indicate which one they consider to be most important to them.  From these responses, destination categories are derived taking into account the most important activity and, in some instances, other activities the leaver is involved in. Read the changes to the survey document .

Consequently, the DLHE survey has different definitions for the destination categories reported. Direct comparisons should not therefore be made with figures presented in previous years.

The coverage of the survey has been expanded to include additional HE qualifications and now includes Non-EU domiciled leavers where it was previously  restricted to UK and European Union domiciled leavers only. The target population in 2011/12 was 703,615 leavers of which 133,175 were Non-EU leavers. Surveying these leavers was undertaken as a pilot for 2011/12 with a clear distinction that the information collected should not be published until carefully reviewed. These leavers are therefore excluded from this SFR. Additionally, there were 2,960 leavers who obtained postgraduate research qualifications from dormant status. The destination outcomes of these leavers are considered to be materially different in nature to the outcomes of the other postgraduate research leavers included in the survey so these leavers have been excluded. 

Key Points - All UK HEIs

In 2011/12 there were 411,005 UK and EU leavers whose destinations were known, 67% (277,035) were working, either in the UK or overseas, 7% were working and studying, 14% were involved in further study, 7% were unemployed and the remaining 4% were involved in some other activity. (See Tables 1 and 2.)

Overall, in 2011/12 9% of all male leavers (both full-time and part-time) whose destinations were known were unemployed, compared to 6% of all females (both full-time and part-time). (See Tables 1 and 2.)

In 2011/12 there were 232,110 full-time first degree UK and EU graduates whose destinations were known, 66% (153,520) were in employment (either in the UK or overseas) and were not also studying and 9% (20,415) were unemployed. (See Table 1 and Chart 1.)

Chart 1 - Destinations of full-time first degree leavers 2011/12

The percentage of full-time first degree leavers who were unemployed varied between subjects, ranging from those which have traditionally low percentages, such as Medicine & dentistry (0%), Education (4%) and Subjects allied to medicine (5%) to those with higher percentages of unemployment, such as, Creative arts & design (11%), Mass communications & documentation (12%) and Computer science (14%). (See Table 3.)  

In 2011/12 of the full-time first degree graduates who were employed in the UK, nearly two-thirds (64%) were in posts classified as Professional employment. The remaining 36% were working in occupational groups classed as non-professional. Sales and customer service occupations accounted for 13% of all leavers in employment, the largest group in the non-professional occupations. (See Table 4a.) 

Of those UK domiciled, first degree graduates (both full-time and part-time) reported as being in full-time paid employment in the UK in 2011/12, 67% disclosed their salary. The median salary reported (to the nearest £500) was £20,000. The mean salary was £21,000 (See Table 5.)

Chart 2 shows that a higher proportion of males than females have salaries of £25,000 or more. The difference between the salaries of males and females is further reflected in the mean and median values. The median salary for female leavers was £19,000 compared to £20,000 for males, and this difference is shown further by the mean salary, £19,000 for females compared to £21,000 for males. (See Table 5.)

Chart 2 - Percentage of UK domiciled full-time first degree leavers in full-time paid UK employment by salary band and gender 2011/12

In 2011/12, there were 21,205 part-time first degree graduates whose destinations were known. Of these, 72% (15,245) were in employment (either in the UK or overseas) and were not also studying and 6% (1,235) were unemployed. (See Table 2 and Chart 3.)  

Chart 3 - Destinations of part-time first degree leavers 2011/12

 

This SFR also includes information on postgraduate and other undergraduate leavers. Looking at Chart 4, it can be seen that there is a considerable difference in the destinations of full-time leavers depending on the qualifications they had achieved. This is particularly noticeable for leavers entering employment; 92% of full-time PGCE leavers in 2011/12 were in employment compared to 28% for foundation degrees.  The percentages entering further study also varied from 1% for PGCE leavers to 49% for foundation degree leavers.

Chart 4 - Destinations of full-time leavers from UK HEIs by level of qualification obtained 2011/12

Chart 5 and Chart 6 present information on the movement of UK students from home and study onto employment. They show the percentages of full-time UK domiciled leavers who entered employment in the UK by their country of domicile, country of institution and country of employment.

Chart 5  - Percentage of Full-time UK domiciled leavers who entered employment within each UK region 
by region of institution 2011/12

Chart 5 shows that in 2011/12 the majority of full-time UK domiciled leavers who entered employment in the UK gained employment in the same country in which they studied, although this varied across the four countries from 98% in England to 62% in Wales.

Chart 6 - Percentage of Full-time UK domiciled leavers who entered employment within each UK region 
by region of domicile 2011/12

Chart 6 shows that in 2011/12 the majority of full-time UK domiciled leavers who entered employment in the UK gained employment in their original country of domicile, and similarly this varies across the four countries from 98% in England to 73% in Wales.

Key Points - England HEIs only

In 2011/12 there were 346,620 leavers from HEIs in England whose destinations were known. Of these, 64% (221,855) were in UK employment, 13% were in further study (46,425) and 7% (25,500) were unemployed. (See Tables 1a, 2a and Chart 7.)

In 2011/12 there were 191,565 full-time first degree graduates whose destinations were known. Of these, 64% (122,035) were in UK employment and 9% (17,355) were unemployed. (See Table 1a and Chart 7.)

In 2011/12, of the 18,700 part-time first degree graduates whose destinations were known, 70% (12,995) were in UK employment and 6% (1,155) were unemployed. (See Table 2a and Chart 7.)

Chart 7 shows the percentages of leavers in each destination by level of qualification obtained with a full-time/part-time split for first degree leavers. 

Chart 7 - Destinations of leavers from HEIs in England by mode and level of qualification obtained 2011/12

Of the 33,195 other undergraduate leavers (both full-time and part-time excluding foundation degree and Professional Graduate Certificate in Education) whose destinations were known, 59% (19,750) were in UK employment. Of the 66,560 postgraduate leavers (both full-time and part-time excluding Postgraduate Certificate in Education) whose destinations were known, 66% (43,945) were in UK employment and a further 9% (6,065) were working overseas. (See Tables 1a, 2a and Chart 7.)

Of those UK domiciled, first degree graduates (both full-time and part-time) reported as being in full-time paid employment in the UK in 2011/12, 68% disclosed their salary.  The median salary reported (to the nearest £500) was £20,000, the lower quartile was £15,000 and the upper quartile £25,000. The mean salary was £21,000. (See Table 5a.)

Key Points - Wales HEIs only

In 2011/12 there were 21,815 leavers from HEIs in Wales whose destinations were known. Of these, 61% (13,345) were in UK employment, 15% (3,225) were in further study and 7% (1,485) were unemployed. (See Tables 1a, 2a and Chart 8.) 

In 2011/12 there were 14,125 full-time first degree graduates whose destinations were known. Of these 60% (8,535) were in UK employment and 8% (1,135) were unemployed. (See Table 1a and Chart 8.)

In 2011/12, of the 615 part-time first degree graduates whose destinations were known, 77% (470) were in UK employment and 3% (20) were unemployed. (See Table 2a and Chart 8.)

Chart 8 shows the percentages of leavers in each destination by level of qualification obtained with a full-time/part-time split for first degree leavers. 

Chart 8 - Destinations of leavers from HEIs in Wales by mode and level of qualification obtained 2011/12

Of the 2,235 other undergraduate leavers (both full-time and part-time excluding foundation degree and Professional Graduate Certificate in Education) whose destinations were known 48%, (1,080) were in UK employment. Of the 3,215 postgraduate leavers students (both full-time and part-time excluding Postgraduate Certificate in Education) whose destinations were known, 69% (2,205) were in UK employment and 7% (220) were employed overseas. (See Tables 1a, 2a and Chart 8.)

Of those UK domiciled, first degree graduates (both full-time and part-time) reported as being in full-time paid employment in the UK in 2011/12, 61% disclosed their salary. The median salary reported (to the nearest £500) was £19,000, the lower quartile was £14,500 and the upper quartile £22,000. The mean salary was £19,500. (See Table 5a.)

Key Points - Scotland HEIs only

In 2011/12 there were 32,735 leavers from HEIs in Scotland whose destinations were known. Of these, 64% (20,880) were in UK employment, 16% (5,120) were in further study and 6% (2,030) were unemployed. (See Tables 1a, 2a and Chart 9.)  

In 2011/12 there were 19,975 full-time first degree graduates whose destinations were known, 63% (12,580) were in UK employment and 7% (1,350) were unemployed. (See Table 1a and Chart 9.)

In 2011/12, of the 1,385 part-time first degree graduates whose destinations were known, 80% (1,110) were in UK employment and 3% (40) were unemployed. (See Table 2a and Chart 9.)

Chart 9 shows the percentages of leavers in each destination by level of qualification obtained with a full-time/part-time split for first degree leavers. 

Chart 9 - Destinations of leavers from HEIs in Scotland by mode and level of qualification obtained 2011/12

 

Of the 3,475 other undergraduate leavers (both full-time and part-time excluding foundation degree and Professional Graduate Certificate in Education) whose destinations were known, 47% (1,615) were in UK employment. Of the 6,835 postgraduate leavers (both full-time and part-time excluding Postgraduate Certificate in Education) whose destinations were known, 67% (4,545) were in UK employment and a further 12% (795) were employed overseas. (See Tables 1a, 2a and Chart 9.)

Of those UK domiciled, first degree graduates (both full-time and part-time) reported as being in full-time paid employment in the UK in 2011/12, 59% disclosed their salary. The median salary reported (to the nearest £500) was £21,000. The lower quartile was £17,000 and the upper quartile £25,000. The mean salary was £22,000. (See Table 5a.)

Key Points - Northern Ireland HEIs only

In 2011/12 there were 9,830 leavers from HEIs in Northern Ireland whose destinations were known. Of these, 66% (6,500) were in UK employment, 10% (995) were in further study and 8% (795) were unemployed. (See Tables 1a, 2a and Chart 10.)  

In 2011/12 there were 6,450 full-time first degree graduates whose destinations were known. Of these 64% (4,150) were in UK employment and 9% (575) were unemployed (See Table 1a and Chart 10.)

In 2011/12, of the 510 part-time first degree graduates whose destinations were known, 72% (365) were in UK employment and 5% (25) were unemployed. (See Table 2a and Chart 10.)

Chart 10 shows the percentages of leavers in each destination by level of qualification obtained with a full-time/part-time split for first degree leavers. 

Chart 10 - Destinations of leavers from HEIs in Northern Ireland by mode and level of qualification obtained 2011/12

Of the 530 other undergraduate leavers (both full-time and part-time excluding foundation degree and Professional Graduate Certificate in Education) whose destinations were known, 73% (390) were in UK employment. Of the 1,975 postgraduate leavers (both full-time and part-time excluding Postgraduate Certificate in Education) whose destinations were known, 67% (1,330) were in UK employment and 14% (265) were employed overseas. (See Tables 1a, 2a and Chart 10.)

Of those UK domiciled, first degree graduates (both full-time and part-time) reported as being in full-time paid employment in the UK in 2011/12, 57% disclosed their salary. The median salary reported (to the nearest £500) was £20,000, the lower quartile was £15,000 and the upper quartile £23,000. The mean salary was £20,000. (See Table 5a.)

Tables

Table 1 Destinations of full-time leavers by gender, activity and level of qualification obtained 2011/12
Table 1a Destinations of full-time leavers by location of institution, activity and level of qualification obtained 2011/12
Table 2 Destinations of part-time leavers by gender, activity and level of qualification obtained 2011/12
Table 2a Destinations of part-time leavers by location of institution, activity and level of qualification obtained 2011/12
Table 3 Destinations of full-time first degree leavers by gender, activity and subject area 2011/12
Table 4a Occupation of full-time first degree leavers entering employment in the UK by location of institution and subject area of degree 2011/12
Table 4b Industry of full-time first degree leavers entering employment in the UK by location of institution and subject area of degree 2011/12
Table 5 UK domiciled leavers who obtained first degree qualifications and entered full-time paid work in the UK by mode of study, gender and salary 2011/12
Table 5a UK domiciled leavers who obtained first degree qualifications and entered full-time paid work in the UK by location of institution, mode of study and salary 2011/12
Table 6a Full-time UK domiciled leavers who entered employment within the UK by location of study, level of qualification obtained and location of employment 2011/12
Table 6b Full-time UK domiciled leavers who entered employment within the UK by domicile, level of qualification obtained and location of employment 2011/12
All tables View all tables

Notes to Users

  1. The statistics in this SFR are derived by HESA from data collected from all publicly-funded higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK (including The Open University) and from The University of Buckingham, which is privately funded. The figures therefore exclude Higher Education (HE) qualifications obtained by students at further education colleges and at other private and independent HE providers.

  2. The 2011/12 Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) data includes all those students whose study was full-time or part-time (see Definition 5) and who obtained relevant qualifications (see Definition 4) reported to HESA for the reporting period 1 August 2011 to 31 July 2012.

  3. The HESA DLHE target population contains all UK, European Union and Non-EU domiciled HE students for whom destinations data is expected and sought (see Definition 6). The figures presented in this SFR are based on information obtained by institutions and returned to HESA but does not include the Non-EU leavers as these are new to the target population for 2011/12. Where the category ‘unknown' appears, the data relates both to non-respondents and to those leavers who have explicitly refused to answer the survey. Data on the number of unknowns is obtained by cross-checking the actual respondents with the total expected to reply, as returned in the 2011/12 HESA Student record.

    In 2011/12, 343,720 full-time qualifiers responded from a target population of 434,480 UK and EU domiciled leavers, which amounts to an overall response rate of 79%. 95,660 part-time qualifiers responded from a target population of 132,995 UK and EU domiciled leavers, an overall response rate of 72%. These response rates include explicit refusals and are calculated separately from this SFR. They will be presented in a publication released by HESA in July 2013 (see Note 4).

    There were 133,175 Non-EU domiciled leavers in the target population for the first time in 2011/12. Responses were received for 36,050 leavers which amounts to an overall response rate of 27%. Of the 2,960 leavers obtaining a postgraduate research qualification from dormant status, responses were received from 1,990 giving an overall response rate of 67%. Both groups of leavers were new to the DLHE population for 2011/12 and HEIs were not set target response rates due to these populations not previously being surveyed. Therefore, these responses have not been included in the tables for this SFR.

    In this SFR the figures for whom destinations are known exclude explicit refusals, for which no other information is available. It can be seen from Table 1 that the percentage of records returned for full-time HE students is 75% and from Table 2 for part-time HE students 64%.

  4. The electronic publication ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education 2011/12', setting out more information about the destinations of students qualifying from HEIs in the UK, will be published by HESA in July 2013.

  5. The Joint Academic Coding System (JACS) of subject classification has been used as the basis for HESA data collections and this SFR.

  6. The qualification acronym ‘PGCE' has traditionally been an abbreviation of ‘Postgraduate Certificate in Education'. However, the academic level of PGCE courses does vary. In April 2005 the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education issued guidance in relation to the Framework for HE Qualifications, which introduced a distinction between those PGCEs pitched at a level equivalent to the final year of an undergraduate Honours degree and those pitched beyond Honours level. The existing postgraduate level qualification was augmented by a new undergraduate level version, entitled the ‘Professional Graduate Certificate in Education'. This change was reflected in the HESA Student Record from 2008/09. For SFR purposes, within Tables 1,1a, 2 and 2a where PGCEs are shown separately both postgraduate and undergraduate versions are included. Where the level of study disaggregation does not show PGCEs separately, ‘Postgraduate Certificates in Education' are included in ‘Postgraduate' totals and ‘Professional Graduate Certificates in Education' are included in ‘Other undergraduate' totals.

  7. The category Full-time paid work, used in Tables 5, 5a and Chart 2 includes those students who indicated any of the activities they were involved in was working full-time (including self-employed/freelance, voluntary or other unpaid work, developing a professional portfolio/creative practice or on an internship).

    When comparing mean and median salaries, it should be noted that whilst a mean shows the arithmetic average salary, this could be skewed by a few abnormally high or low values. The median takes the middle value and is therefore less affected by very high or low salaries.

  8. The definition of unemployment used within this SFR is not necessarily consitsistent with other National Statistic outputs such as the Labour Force Survey. 

Definitions

  1. HE students are those students on courses for which the level of instruction is above that of the Qualifications and Curriculum Development Agency (QCDA) National Qualifications Framework (NQF)/Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) level 3 (or equivalent) e.g. courses at the level of Certificate of HE and above.

  2. The survey dates for this DLHE return were 16 April 2012 (if the leaver obtained the qualification between 1 August 2011 and 31 December 2011) and 14 January 2013 (if the leaver obtained the qualification between 1 January 2012 and 31 July 2012).

    In the DLHE survey leavers are able to report what they are doing in relation to both employment and study. If not ineligible, or have explicitly refused to provide information, respondents were able to report up to eight individual activities, of which one must be indicated to be the 'most important'. These activities are as follows:

    • Working full-time (including self-employed/freelance, voluntary or other unpaid work, developing a professional portfolio/creative practice or on an internship)
    • Working part-time (including self-employed/freelance, voluntary or other unpaid work, developing a professional portfolio/creative practice or on an internship)
    • Unemployed and looking for work
    • Due to start a job in the next month
    • Engaged in full-time further study, training or research
    • Engaged in part-time further study, training or research
    • Taking time out in order to travel
    • Something else
    These activities are used to derive a category for publication that reflects the range of activities undertaken. Leavers identified as ineligible, or who have explicitly refused to provide information are grouped for publication as 'Ineligibility or explicit refusal'. All other respondents are categorised according to their range of activities as follows:

    Status Most important activity If any other activity includes Derived activity category
    Ineligibility or explicit refusal     Ineligibility or explicit refusal
    All other Working full-time Engaged in full-time study, training or research OR Engaged in part-time further study, training or research Primarily in work and also studying
    Otherwise Full-time work
    Working part-time Engaged in full-time study, training or research OR Engaged in part-time further study, training or research Primarily in work and also studying
    Otherwise Part-time work
    Unemployed and looking for work   Unemployed
    Due to start a job in the next month Working full-time Full-time work
    Engaged in full-time further study, training or research, provided that Working full-time has not been selected. Full-time study
    Working part-time, provided that Working full-time AND Engaged in full-time further study, training or research have not been selected. Part-time work
    Otherwise Due to start work
    Engaged in full-time further study, training or research Working full-time OR Working part-time Primarily studying and also in work
    Otherwise Full-time study
    Engaged in part-time further study, training or research Working full-time OR Working part-time Primarily studying and also in work
    Otherwise Part-time study
    Taking time out in order to travel   Other
    Something else   Other
  3. Employment

    The category Work includes both full-time work and part-time work.  

    The catergory Work and study includes both primarily in work and also studying, and primarily studying and also in work.  

    For the purposes of Tables 4a, 4b, 6a and 6b the catergories Work and Work and study have been combined.

    The category Full-time work, used in Tables 5, 5a and Chart 2 includes those students who indicated any of the activities they were involved in was working full-time (including self-employed/freelance, voluntary or other unpaid work, developing a professional portfolio/creative practice or on an internship).

  4. Further study

    The category Further study includes both full-time study and part-time study. 

  5. Unemployment

    Unemployed includes the catergories unemployed and due to start work.  
      

  6. Unknown

    This category includes non-respondents and explicit refusals, and is used in Tables 1, 1a, 2, 2a and 3.
  7. Qualifications

    Relevant qualifications for inclusion in the 2011/12 DLHE return are listed in Definition 4 below.
    The population for the DLHE return does not necessarily represent the full cohort graduating during the reporting period; relevant higher education qualifications exclude intercalated degrees, awards to visiting students, students on post-registration health and social care courses, professional qualifications for serving school teachers, and awards of institutional credit.

  8. Level of qualification obtained

    Postgraduate qualifications obtained includes doctorate degrees obtained/not obtained primarily through research and New Route PhD; masters degrees obtained/not obtained primarily through research, Masters in Teaching and Learning, pre-registration masters degrees leading towards obtaining eligibility to register to practice with a health or social care or veterinary statutory regulatory body and postgraduate bachelors degrees; postgraduate diplomas, certificates and professional qualifications, Postgraduate Certificates in Education or Professional Graduate Diplomas in Education (unless shown separately); other taught qualifications at level M including those leading towards registration with the Architects Registration Board (Part 2 qualification); Diplomas at level M (but excluding those specifically for Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector).

    In certain analyses where PGCE is shown separately, this includes both Postgraduate Certificates in Education/Professional Graduate Diplomas in Education and Professional Graduate Certificates in Education.

    In analyses where postgraduate qualification obtained is disaggregated into Doctorate and Other postgraduate the following groupings are used:

    Doctorate qualifications obtained includes qualifications obtained includes doctorate degrees obtained/not obtained primarily through research and New Route PhD.

    Other postgraduate qualifications obtained includes other postgraduate qualifications obtained primarily through advanced supervised research; diplomas at level M; other taught qualifications at level M including those leading towards obtaining eligibility to register to practice with a health or social care or veterinary statutory regulatory body, and those leading towards registration with the Architects Registration Board (Part 2 qualification); Diplomas, Fellowships, and advanced professional certificates at level M (but excluding those diplomas specifically for Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector); National Vocational Qualifications (NVQ) at level M; Scottish Vocational Qualifications (SVQ) at level 5; Taught qualification at level M (where qualification at level H and/or level M is a pre-requisite for course entry) leading towards registration with the Architects Registration Board (Part 3 qualification); Level 7 Diplomas in Teaching in the Lifelong Learning Sector plus Postgraduate Certificates in Education or Professional Graduate Diplomas in Education.

    First degree qualifications obtained includes integrated undergraduate/postgraduate taught masters degrees on the enhanced/extended pattern, including those leading towards obtaining eligibility to register to practice with a health or social care or veterinary statutory regulatory body, and first degrees with honours on the enhanced/extended pattern at level H; first degrees with honours/ordinary first degrees (including those leading to qualified teacher status (QTS)/registration with a General Teaching Council (GTC), but excluding those from the intercalated pattern); first degrees with honours leading towards registration with the Architects Registration Board (Part 1 qualification); pre-registration first degrees with honours/ordinary first degrees leading towards obtaining eligibility to register to practice with a health or social care or veterinary statutory regulatory body; first degrees with honours and diploma; postgraduate bachelors degrees at level H.

    Other undergraduate qualifications obtained include all other qualifications at levels H, I, J and C with the exception of visiting students at levels H and I with formal or informal credit; post-registration health and social care qualifications at levels H and I other than a first degree with honours or ordinary (non-honours) first degree; post-registration health and social care qualifications at level J; professional qualifications at level I for serving schoolteachers; and credits at level H, I, J and C.

    In certain analyses Foundation degrees (e.g. FdA, FdSc) are shown separately. Foundation degrees were first introduced in September 2001 to provide vocational higher education qualifications.

    Further details of the frameworks used to classify courses are available at www.hesa.ac.uk/C11051/a/COURSEAIM.

  9. Mode of study

    Full-time includes full-time and sandwich modes plus those writing-up where the mode of study was previously full-time and students recorded as dormant status who were previously enrolled full-time.

    Part-time includes those studying part-time, those who were full-time for less than 24 weeks in the academic year, block release or studying during the evenings, plus those writing-up theses who were previously enrolled part-time.

  10. Domicile

    UK domicile students are those whose normal residence prior to commencing their programme of study was in the UK, including those living in Guernsey, Jersey and the Isle of Man. Other European Union (Other EU) domicile students are those whose normal residence was in countries which were EU members or in their designated territories as at 1 December 2011. Non-European-Union (Non-EU) students are those whose normal residence prior to commencing their programme of study was outside the EU.

  11. Location of employment

    This describes the location of the HE leaver's place of work. Data is supplied to HESA in the form of postcodes, town/city names or country codes. Where this was unknown but the activity was work or a combination of work and study a United Kingdom location of employment has been assumed. These numbers are, however, relatively small. Where location of employment is not known it is assumed to be UK. This represented 0.5% of the total number in UK Work for Table 1 and 0.8% for Table 2.

  12. Salary

    Describes the annual salary surveyed to the nearest thousand pounds before tax, for leavers indicating any of their activities on the survey date was full-time paid work. Provision of salary information may legitimately be refused. Salary calculations in Tables 5 and 5a are expressed to the nearest £500 and exclude leavers with unknown salaries or salaries reported as £0. 

  13. Occupation
    In 2011 HESA adopted the SOC2010 Standard Occupational Classification (which replaced SOC2000), for comparability of sector data with other areas of the economy. A variant of the SOC2010 was created for the coding of occupational information collected in the DLHE survey. The classification is termed SOC2010 (DLHE) and details are available from the Downloadable files section of the HESA DLHE coding manual www.hesa.ac.uk/C11018 on the HESA website (Standard Occupational Classification (2010) for the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Institutions: SOC 2010 (DLHE)) (pdf).

  14. Industry
    From 2008/09 the aggregations reflect the Standard Industrial Classification economic activity sections as summarised in the UK Standard Industrial Classification of Economic Activities 2007 (SIC 2007). To enable production of comparable time series the new SIC categories have been grouped to fit with the old categories using: www.statistics.gov.uk/methods_quality/sic/downloads/SIC2007explanatorynotes.pdf

  15. Location of institution

    The allocation of an institution to a geographical region is done by reference to the administrative centre of that institution. There may be students registered at institutions who are studying in regions other than that of the administrative centre of the institution.
    The Open University is counted as a wholly English institution. The administrative centre is located in England, although The Open University teaches throughout the UK.

  16. Rounding strategy

    In the text and tables the figures presented are rounded. 0, 1 and 2 are rounded to 0. All other numbers are rounded up or down, to the nearest multiple of 5. This rounding strategy is also applied to totals figures, a consequence of which is that the sum of numbers in each row or column rarely precisely matches the totals shown. Percentages are calculated on precise raw numbers and are suppressed if they are calculated on a population which contains 52 or fewer individuals. These cases are represented as '..'. Within this SFR percentages in tables, charts and text are displayed to 0 decimal places.

Press enquiries should be directed to the Press Office at the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), 95 Promenade, Cheltenham, GL50 1HZ, telephone 01242 211120. General enquiries about the data contained within this SFR should be addressed to Jenny Skeet, Statistical Analyst, HESA (at the same address), telephone 01242 211115.

ENDS