Data definitions

 

Estates Management Statistics 2009/10

return to index

Data definitions

Version 1.5 Produced 2011-02-07

Note: Mandatory data items are indicated in the last column. These data items must be returned by higher education institutions (HEIs) in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The Scottish Funding Council (SFC) strongly advises that HEIs in Scotland complete the following sustainability measures: D21, D38b, D38c and D73, as this information may be required in future to respond to Scottish Government targets and reporting requirements on sustainability. HEIs are encouraged to provide full data to allow for complete statistics for the sector to be collated.

Data definition Data definition sub-head Data item identifier Data label Guidance Mandatory data item (Y)

D01 HEI income

This data will be provided by HESA.

All numbers should be consistent with the requirements of the SORP (Statement of Recommended Practice: accounting for further and higher education) with the exception of C14 data.

Information on the SORP can be found at http://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/Publications/Documents/SORP_2007.pdf.

D01.C04

Teaching total

This data will be provided by HESA.

Teaching income should include all income categorised as Funding Council grants including recurrent grants for teaching, specific grants and deferred capital grants.

Includes further education students.

Excludes Funding Council allowance for the research element of recurrent grant and income from franchise students.

D01.C07

Research total

This data will be provided by HESA.

Research income is all income declared in the accounts earned from research grants and contracts.

Add in Funding Council allowance for the research element of recurrent grant.

D01.C12

Other non-residential

This data will be provided by HESA.

Other income is all other non-residential operating income and endowment and interest receivable not included under headings C04, C07 and C13.

D01.C13

Total non-residential

This data will be provided by HESA.

Total non-residential income. Sum total of C04, C07 and C12.

D01.C14

Residential

Residential income is rental income earned from students over the duration of the normal academic year.

Exclude income earned from such students for catering, unless this income is minimal. (This is contrary to the HESA Finance Statistics Return (part of the HESA Finance Statistics Return with Higher Education Business and Community Interaction Survey)).

D01.C01

Total HEI

This data will be provided by HESA.

Total consolidated income of the HEI from all sources (e.g. Funding Council grants, academic fees and support grants, research grants and contracts, other operating income and endowment income and interest receivable) or as qualified by headings. C04, C07, C12 and C14 should sum to this total.

D02 HEI expenditure

All numbers should be consistent with the requirements of the SORP (Statement of Recommended Practice: accounting for further and higher education).

Information on the SORP can be found at http://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/Publications/Documents/SORP_2007.pdf.

D02.C13

Total non-residential

Total consolidated revenue expenditure of the HEI for total non-residential activities including staff costs, other operating expenditure, depreciation and interest payable.

D02.C14

Residential

That part of C01 which is incurred in connection with the provision of student residences.

Exclude expenditure incurred in the provision of catering services and of conferences, unless this expenditure is minimal. (HESA cannot provide this from the HESA Finance Statistics Return with Higher Education Business and Community Interaction Survey)

D02.C01

Total HEI

This data will be provided by HESA.

Total consolidated revenue expenditure of the HEI including staff costs, other operating expenditure, depreciation and interest payable. Sum total of C13 and C14.

D03 Student headcount

This data will be provided by HESA.

The number of students recorded for 1 December each year and as submitted to HESA in individual student records.

Include figures for further education students but exclude figures for distance learning and franchise students.

D03.C04

Teaching total

Students on taught courses as defined for the HESA Student Record Return.

D03.C07

Research total

Research students as defined for the HESA Student Record Return.

D03.C01

Total HEI

Number of students on taught courses and in research as defined for the HESA Student Record Return. Sum total of C04 and C07.

D04 Student FTE

This data will be provided by HESA.

Include figures for further education students but exclude figures for distance learning and franchise.

D04.C04

Teaching total

Number of full-time equivalent students on taught courses as defined for the HESA Student Record Return.

D04.C07

Research total

Number of full-time equivalent research students as defined for the HESA Student Record Return.

D04.C01

Total HEI

Number of full-time equivalent students on taught courses and in research as defined for the HESA Student Record Return. Sum total of C04 and C07.

D05 FTE staff

Full time equivalent (FTE) staff, (at 1 December) classified as follows:

D05.C04

Teaching total

A figure for Total FTE teaching staff (including academic support staff).

D05.C07

Research total

A figure for Total FTE research staff (including academic support staff).

D05.C04+C07

Teaching total + Research total

Total of FTE teaching staff and FTE research staff (including academic and academic support staff).

Academic support staff are those directly linked to the administration of academic departments (managers, secretaries, clerical and other support staff). The staff in this category will relate to those used to compile Heads 1 and 6 of Table 7 of the Finance Statistics Return (part of the HESA Finance Statistics Return with Higher Education Business and Community Interaction Survey).

However, academic staff associated with departmental libraries should be included under C04+C07, and not under C10 as would be required by using the HESA Finance Statistics Return (part of the Finance Statistics Return with Higher Education Business and Community Survey) return. Include contracted-out staff only where office provision has to be made.

Medical school staff who are funded or partially funded by the NHS or equivalent sources, but who are employed by the HEI in some form, should be included under C04+C07.

D05.C08

Support offices

Support Staff entered under C10 who are predominantly based in offices. Include contracted-out staff where office provision has to be made.

D05.C09

Support other

Support Staff entered under C10 who are predominantly not based in offices (e.g. porters, catering, grounds, maintenance and security staff).

D05.C10

Support total

Total of other central support staff, e.g. HEI-wide managers (not in academic departments), secretarial, clerical, telephonists etc. Include central library staff, porters and security staff. Exclude staff allocated to student residences, but include catering staff as far as possible.

The staff in this category relate to Heads 2, 3, 4, 5 and 7 of Table 7 of the Finance Statistics Return (part of the HESA Finance Statistics Return with Higher Education Business and Community Interaction Survey). Include staff working directly for companies providing contract services (e.g. cleaning) to the HEI only where office provision has to be made. Sum total of C08 and C09.

D05.C12

Other non-residential

Total of other staff not academic or central support, but who are on the payroll of the HEI. This may include staff who are associated with the 'Other' floorspace activities described under head D11/C12 e.g. art galleries and museums.

Staff who are exclusively concerned with either distance learning students or franchised students (FE or HE) should be returned under this heading. Where time is spent by staff on 'traditional' academic work also, a pro rata allocation will be required.

D05.C13

Total non-residential

Total non-residential staff entered in C04+C07, C10 and C12.

D05.C14

Residential

Staff allocated to student residences should fall under this heading. The staff in this category relate to Head 5 of Table 7 in the Finance Statistics Return (part of the HESA Finance Statistics Return with Higher Education Business and Community Interaction Survey).

Exclude catering staff under this heading (who should be categorised under the appropriate Support heading).

 

D05.C01

Total HEI

Total staff including all academic, research, support, administrative and technical staff. This should relate to the staff information used to compile the return for Table 7 in the Finance Statistics Return (part of the HESA Finance Statistics Return with Higher Education Business and Community Interaction Survey). Sum total of C04+C07, C08, C09, C12 and C14.

D05a FTE environmental staff

These staff should also have been included in the appropriate category in D05.

Number of professional and support staff employed to improve the HEI's environmental performance.

Staff included would typically be involved in the development and implementation of strategy, policy and objectives in order to reduce an HEI's environmental impact with particular emphasis on energy, waste, water, transport, procurement and biodiversity.

Where only a proportion of a member of staff's time is allocated to the activity of overseeing and implementing the institution's environmental policy (e.g. Director of Estate), an apportionment of FTE from that contract can be included.

D05a.C01

Total HEI

Total FTE environmental staff for the whole estate.

D06 Number of sites

The number of independent sites operated by the HEI.

Exclude residential property. Sites should normally have a floorspace of at least 1000 sq m and would normally be at least 1km away from any other site. They should be physically and functionally severed from other sites, and would not normally be single buildings. However, HEIs should return what they consider to be a site.

D06.C13

Total non-residential

Figure for the total non-residential estate.

D07 Number of buildings

Where buildings are joined together, a common sense view should be taken. A separate building should normally be recorded where:

  • The building is recorded and treated separately in the HEI's property information system
  • The building has a different entrance (but a building can have more than one entrance)
  • The building is served by different service cores and staircases (although, again, a building may have more than one set of these)
  • The building has floorspace recorded as net internal area under head D12 below
  • The building is fully enclosed (i.e. open-sided buildings do not count)
  • The building is capable of functioning as a self-contained unit
  • All buildings should be recorded, however temporary. Thus, portakabins and the like should be included. Farm buildings should be included if maintained and operated by the HEI. Exclude buildings held for investment or primarily income generation purposes (e.g. commercial farm not used for academic purposes, commercial property, etc.).

The number of buildings is included for the purposes of making comparisons and not as a KPI in its own right.

D07.C13

Total non-residential

The total number of non-residential buildings maintained and operated by the HEI.

D07.C14

Residential

The total number of residential buildings maintained, occupied or operated by the HEI.

D07.C01

Total HEI

The total number of freestanding buildings (including residential) in the estate. Sum total of C13 and C14.

D08 Site area

The total site area of the non-residential estate, measured in hectares, held by the HEI for its operational purposes. Include the non-residential component of grounds area in the figure (see D09), playing fields (see D10) and all building footprints.

D08.C13

Total non-residential

Figure for the total non-residential estate.

D09 Grounds area

Measurement, in hectares (ha), of the grounds of the estate, both water and listed/heritage areas.

D09a Grounds area water

D09.C01a

Total HEI

Surface area of water forms owned or managed by the HEI to the nearest 0.1ha for the total estate.

This must only include non-treated water sources and should therefore exclude fountains and other treated water features.

Include SUDS (sustainable drainage systems), but exclude water tanks for the storage of rain water, or 'grey water'.

D09b Grounds area listed/heritage

D09.C01b

Total HEI

Area of landscaping owned or managed by the HEI with 'Listed Status' or within English Heritage http://http://www.english-heritage.org.uk (or Historic Scotland http://http://www.historic-scotland.gov.uk, or CADW http://http://www.cadw.wales.gov.uk in Wales) 'Register of Parks and Gardens', or 'The Register of Landscapes of Special Historic Interest'. Figure for the total estate.

This may include areas within listed buildings, such as quadrangles, but only if they have been listed separately.

Data should be rounded to the nearest 0.1 ha.

D09.C01

Total HEI

Total grounds area should include D9a - Grounds area water and D9b Grounds area listed/heritage.

The total hectarage of grounds (including residential areas) regularly maintained by the HEI. Exclude space allocated under D10 (Playing fields area), farmland held for investment or primarily commercial purposes and space which is left fallow (e.g. development sites, non-maintained woodland etc.). Include the area of surface level car parks and highways and operational farmland, which are the maintenance responsibility of the HEI.

D10 Playing fields area

The total hectarage of playing fields regularly maintained and used by the HEI. Exclude space allocated under D09 (Grounds area) and space which is left fallow (e.g. development sites, non-maintained woodland etc.).

D10.C01

Total HEI

Figure for the total estate.

D11 Gross internal area

This definition is based around the definitions contained in the 'Code of Measuring Practice: A guide for Property Professionals' (Sixth Edition), published by The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. Due consideration to the needs of the higher education sector have been made in putting this definition together.

Gross internal area (GIA) is the total area of buildings owned or occupied or maintained by the HEI measured to the internal face of the perimeter walls at each floor level (i.e. the footprint of the building excluding the width of the outside walls). It includes areas occupied by internal areas and partitions.

Sum of net internal area and balance area as defined in D12.

Note that the following are included:

  • Areas occupied by internal walls (both structural walls and temporary walls) and partitions.
  • The GIA of student residential buildings.
  • The GIA of housing for staff (including wardens' accommodation in residences).
  • Accommodation on NHS sites which is maintained or paid for.

Excludes:

  • Derelict space. This is space that is currently unoccupied and incapable of occupation and no reinstatement is planned within the next year. Space that is currently not occupied due to refurbishment or other activities should not be classed as derelict space. Similarly, space that has been classed as Condition D in Building Condition terms (see D20) should not also be classed as derelict space: it is either Condition D in Building Condition or it is derelict.
  • Accommodation on NHS sites which is neither maintained nor paid for.
  • Perimeter wall thickness and external projections.
  • Any structure attached to the outside of the external wall of a building (e.g. external open-sided balconies, covered ways, fire escapes and canopies.
  • Investment properties used to derive an income (i.e. any property from which income is derived from a commercial or private tenant).

D11.C13

Total non-residential

Figure for the total non-residential estate. Enter the total gross internal area of non-residential space in accordance with the inclusions under D12/C13.

Y

D11.C14

Residential

Figure for the residential estate. Enter the total gross internal area of residential space in accordance with the inclusions under D12/C14.

Y

D11.C01

Total HEI

Figure for the total estate. Sum total of C13 and C14.

Y

D12 Net internal area

There are two alternative approaches for the return of data on net internal area (NIA):

  • NIA RICS (Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors) basis
  • NIA room area

The NIA RICS definitions are contained in the 'Code of Measuring Practice: A Guide for Property Professionals' (Sixth Edition), published by the RICS.

Room area is net internal area less the width of internal walls and partitions. Information is required for the same categories of space as Net Internal Area (D12), with the same definitions applying apart from the measurement of space.

HEIs should return data in the form that is most straightforward for them. However the NIA RICS definition is preferred.

NIA

Net Internal Area is the usable area within a building measured to the internal face of the perimeter walls at each floor level. NIA covers all areas which are used for a specific purpose. It does not include those parts of buildings which enable them to function, i.e. balance areas defined below.

Includes:

  • Teaching and research rooms
  • Offices
  • Kitchens
  • Workshops
  • Built-in units, cupboards etc. occupying usable area
  • Stores
  • Academic stores
  • Changing rooms and showers (e.g. within or as part of clean rooms, catering facilities, sports facilities)
  • Porters' offices and kiosks
  • First aid rooms
  • Staff common room
  • Internal partition walls (e.g. fixed walls, de-mountable re-moveable screens)
  • Ramps of lightweight construction to false floors
  • A floor area which contains a ventilation / heating grille
  • Area occupied by skirting and perimeter trunking
  • Areas severed by internal non-structural walls, demountable partitions (whether or not permanent) etc. where the purpose of the division is partition of use (not support) provided the area beyond is not used in common (by more than one occupier)
  • Pavement vaults
  • Notional lift lobby and similar areas, where there are several functions using the area, such as meeting space, reception or cafe
  • Accommodation on NHS sites which is maintained or paid for.

Balance Area

Balance areas i.e. the floor area planned or provided as part of the gross internal area to enable the building to function e.g.:

  • Corridors and other circulation areas of a permanent nature (e.g. fire corridors, smoke lobbies, etc.)
  • Internal open-sided balconies or similar
  • Internal structural walls, walls enclosing excluded areas, columns, piers, chimney breasts, vertical ducts and other projections
  • Stairways and stairwells (and voids over)
  • Entrance lobbies (where the function is solely or primarily for entry/circulation)
  • Foyers (where the function is solely or primarily for entry/circulation)
  • Atria with clear height above, measured at base level only (where the function is solely or primarily for entry/circulation)
  • Lifts
  • Permanent lift lobbies, permanent lift rooms, liftwells and lifts (and voids over)
  • Lavatories and toilet lobbies
  • Cloakrooms
  • Cleaners' stores
  • Cleaners' cupboards (as defined in the RICS definition)
  • Covered areas e.g. plant rooms, tank rooms, fuel stores which are housed in a structure of a permanent nature, whether or not above main-roof level.
  • Loading bays
  • Ducts
  • Permanent and continuous air-conditioning, heating or cooling apparatus (as defined in the RICS definition)
  • Boiler houses
  • Calorifier chambers
  • Fuel stores.

Space otherwise considered as balance areas, such as foyers, may only be included in NIA where it meets the appropriate definition.

Exclusions

  • Accommodation on NHS sites which is neither maintained nor paid for
  • Areas under the control of service or other external authorities including meter cupboards and statutory service supply points (as defined under the RICS definition)
  • Areas with a headroom of less than 1.5m (as defined under the RICS definition).

Breakdown of NIA Space

Where space is used for dual purposes, an attribution on the basis outlined under heading D41 should be used. This will apply in particular to data returns under headings C04 and C07.

In addition, any space such as storage space that may be attributable to either the 'office' or 'core' element of teaching or research, should be assigned to either of these categories on the basis of their actual use. Thus, if a storage room opens into a teaching office and is used for storing student records, then it should be assigned to teaching office space. The same method must be used for all space allocation.

D12.C02

Teaching offices

The net internal area of offices associated with teaching space.

Include academic support staff offices if used for the purposes of departmental, divisional or faculty support staff. Includes managers, administrators, executives, secretaries and technicians (if they have identifiable office space). Include ancillary storage space. Include the offices of staff who are contracted to teach, and any attribution of other office space used for teaching activities.

D12.C03

Teaching other

The net internal area of teaching space (not offices) of the HEI.

Includes teaching rooms, lecture theatres, seminar rooms, laboratories, stores, computing facilities and workshops used for teaching, any special curriculum-based buildings such as gymnasia and sports facilities, other buildings (e.g. animal houses). Include greenhouses, farms, field stations, observatories etc. if used for teaching and predominantly used by the HEI. If the HEI is not the predominant user of such facilities then include under Other non-residential (C12).

D12.C04

Teaching total

Teaching space is NIA used for teaching or for teaching support. Sum total of C02 and C03.

D12.C05

Research offices

The net internal area of offices associated with research space.

Include academic support staff offices if used for the purposes of departmental, divisional or faculty support staff. Includes managers, administrators, executives, secretaries and technicians (if they have identifiable office space). Include ancillary storage space. Include the offices of staff who are contracted to undertake research, and any attribution of other office space used for research activities.

D12.C06

Research other

The net internal area of core research space (not offices) of the HEI.

Includes research laboratories and associated stores and workshops, computing facilities, offices of staff and support staff working on research, other buildings (e.g. animal houses) used for research. Include greenhouses, farms, field stations, observatories etc. if used for research and predominantly used by the HEI. If the HEI is not the predominant user of such facilities then include under Other non-residential (C12).

D12.C07

Research total

Research space is NIA used for research. Sum total of C05 and C06.

D12.C08

Support offices

The net internal area of offices not included elsewhere and used to support the operations of the HEI as a whole (see C10 below).

Office space may include that space used to house central managers and administrators and their departments and associated activities. Space primarily used to house central administrative and support staff and associated activities. The VC/Principals office and deputies, Council Chambers, boardrooms. Includes Finance, Registry, Planning, Estates etc. offices. Include ancillary storage space.

D12.C09

Support other

The net internal area of space which is not offices and which is not included elsewhere and is used to support the operations of the HEI as a whole.

The type of space falling within this category includes non-office central support/administration space, social space, sports facilities (where not used predominantly for teaching), catering space and support space. Learning space should be included in this category and is defined as centrally-available and controlled NIA used as learning resource centres, libraries or open access computer space available for general student use. Similar space used for departments should be allocated to teaching or research as appropriate. As with teaching and research space, the office element of 'Central support' space should be identified separately (C08), with the residual Other space coded under C09.

D12.C10

Support total

All other non-teaching or research space, except for non-residential vacant space (C11), residential (C13) and other space (C12). Sum total of C08 and C09.

D12.C10b

Support associated with catering

The figure should also be included within definitions C08 and C09 as appropriate.

The net internal area of all space associated with central catering, including any associated offices.

This would normally include catering preparation areas and seating and associated space. If the seating and associated space is not exclusively or primarily for catering-related purposes, then an apportionment of the space between space types is acceptable. Central catering is defined as space that is provided for use by all users of the estate and would normally include activities such as central dining rooms, staff dining rooms, cafeteria and snack bars, licensed bars and central vending facilities. Exclude Student Unions, which are returned under C12.

D12.C10c

Support learning centre space

The net internal area of library/learning centre space, as included in D12/C08 and C09.

In accordance with the definition used in the Society of College, National and University Libraries (SCONUL) annual statistics, libraries/learning centres are defined as a systematic collection of information resources under the control of the Librarian or Director of Information Services, or equivalent, and having a separate entrance. These resources may be in print or other media. A storage facility, whether or not staffed, on or off-campus, counts as a separate library if it has a separate entrance. It also includes PC clusters, even large open access PC areas, housed within libraries, and photocopying services.

Include offices that are part of the library/learning centre, such as offices for the Head of the Resource Centre, section management, technical facilities staff, subject librarians, general librarians and resource administration.

Note that this definition includes open access computing areas that are integral to the library/learning centre, but would leave other dispersed open access rooms in the support category C09.

The floor area return is likely to include the types of space covered by the SCONUL Statistical Return heading 1b and 1d http://http://www.sconul.ac.uk, but note that the SCONUL data are gross areas and for the avoidance of doubt, the net area is requested here.

D12.C11

Vacant non-residential

Vacant space is the net internal area within the premises that is currently physically unoccupied for whatever reason.

This would include space that is treated as surplus to requirements and is currently unoccupied.

However, exclude space that is treated as surplus but is still currently occupied, which should be classified under the appropriate category. Include space that is currently awaiting, or in the course of refurbishment or redevelopment, and space that is reserved for future occupation.

Exclude space which is derelict.

D12.C12

Other non-residential

Other space is all other NIA, including space primarily kept for national and other purposes such as museums, art galleries etc (e.g. Ashmolean Museum).

Include Students Unions, staff housing (except wardens) and commercial activities of the HEI under this category. This may include conference venue space where the conference facility is entirely or primarily separate from the HEI's academic and support activities.

D12.C13

Total non-residential

Sum of non-residential space. Sum total of C04, C07, C10, C11 and C12.

Y

D12.C14

Residential

Residential space is NIA used to house students of the HEI. Exclude space used for catering facilities (include under C09 as far as possible) and space used for commercial conference facilities (include under C12 as far as possible) throughout the year. Include space taken up by wardens in residences.

D12.C01

Total HEI

Total net internal area for the whole estate, including residential buildings (where available). Sum total of C13 and C14.

D13 Method used to measure floor area

D12 requires only one return for floor area data.

Indicate in D13 whether the institution's floor space data conforms to the net internal area definition (N) (provided in D12 and RICS Red Book) or uses a room area basis (R).

D13.C01

Total HEI

Enter N or R.

D14 Specialist academic area

The total amount of academic floor space (i.e. teaching and research space) that can be classified as 'specialist' in terms of its use for a limited number of academic disciplines i.e. NIA designed for specialist use (either teaching or research) and which cannot easily be used for other non-specialist activities. It includes rooms or facilities with abnormal or exceptional equipment where such a feature inhibits the use of the room for other non-specialist activities, such as general teaching.

Types of space included in this category may include laboratories, specialist theatres and drama studios, catering facilities used as part of academic courses, dark rooms, recording studios etc. Exclude all general seminar and classrooms, lecture halls and lecture theatres (raked or non-raked).

D14a

D14a.C03

Teaching other

Figure for specialist teaching area.

D14b

D14b.C06

Research other

Figure for specialist research area.

D14.C01

Total HEI

Figure for the whole estate.

D15 Area cleaned

The area cleaned on a regular daily or weekly basis by the HEI in non-residential buildings. This area should relate to that space for which cleaning costs have been provided under D34/C13. Exclude any highly specialised cleaning (e.g. contamination areas). The area figure should be split as follows:

a) Gross internal area cleaned (sq m)

b) External site area cleaned (hectares).

In line with D34, external window cleaning would normally be included as part of internal area cleaned, as it relates to the cleaning of premises. The external area cleaned should only cover those areas where routine cleaning is undertaken, which may be less than the whole estate.

Note: the external site area should reflect only non-residential sites.

D15a

D15a.C13

Total non-residential

Gross internal area cleaned for the non-residential estate (sq m).

D15b

D15b.C13

Total non-residential

External site area cleaned for the total non-residential estate (hectares).

D16 Frequency rate

Applies only to teaching space under C03, as appropriate to the coverage of the space utilisation survey (see D17).

It should be noted that the definitions and accompanying good practice guidelines, are in accordance with the advice produced in the NAO report 'Management of Space in Higher Education Institutions in Wales' (1996) http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/archive/9596.aspx.

The frequency rate is the number of hours a teaching room is in use as a proportion of total time available.

The frequency should be measured on an hourly basis. As an example, if a room were used for 4 hours out of an 8 hour 'working day' then the frequency rate would be 50%.

The preference is for a survey-based return. However, it may only be possible to make a return based on an analysis of room bookings or timetabled use. The method used needs to be specified (see D45).

The measure of frequency that is required is as follows:

It is necessary to base the measurement of frequency on a 'standard core working day.' This is defined as the eight hour period of 9am - 5pm. Lunchtime periods and break periods are to be included in the analysis. The frequency rate should be standardised across this period, which may require the HEI to make adjustments. Thus, if existing information on frequency runs from, e.g. 8.30 am to 5.30 pm, then this should be adjusted to cover the period 9.00 am to 5.00pm.

The year and month that the survey or room booking/timetable analysis was carried out should be specified in the data return. This should be the latest survey data.

The following comments are provided as general good practice guidance in carrying out the survey and analysis:

The survey period used

A full week period (Monday to Friday inclusive) should be used in collecting data and should form the basis of the return. Factoring-up the results of a one-day survey is not acceptable for the return.

The time frame

A survey count based on an hourly frequency should be used, rather than, say, one count in the morning and one count in the afternoon. This will produce more accurate and usable results. Only data based upon an hourly count should be returned.

Scope of survey

It may not be possible to survey all the teaching space identified under D12/C03, as HEIs are likely to have various arrangements and management of space in place. However, it is recommended that both 'central' or 'pooled' space and 'local' or 'departmental' space is covered in a survey.

The area covered by the frequency rate survey (see D17) should be the same space used in making the occupancy rate return (see D18).

Also enter the basis of calculation of frequency rate - see D45 and the area covered in D17.

D16.C03a

Teaching other

Teaching: Frequency rate. A percentage should be returned to one decimal place.

The Frequency rate is the number of hours a teaching room is in use as a proportion of total time available.

The frequency should be measured on an hourly basis. As an example, if a room were used for 4 hours out of an 8 hour 'working day' then the frequency rate would be 50%.

D16.C03b

Teaching other

Teaching: Month of survey. Return a month in figures e.g. February = 02, October = 10.

The year and month that the survey or room booking/timetable analysis was carried out should be specified in the data return. This should be the latest survey data.

D16.C03c

Teaching other

Teaching: Year of survey. Return a four digit year e.g. 2009.

The year and month that the survey or room booking/timetable analysis was carried out should be specified in the data return. This should be the latest survey data.

D17 Frequency rate coverage

The net internal area of floor space that the frequency measure provided in D16 relates to. The type of space that is included will be dependent upon the approach adopted by individual HEIs. In other words, the amount of floor space covered by the frequency and occupancy survey may be less than the total teaching space returned under D12/C03.

However, the return should only relate to teaching space. This may include standard class rooms (be they centrally controlled or booked, or locally/departmentally managed), lecture theatres/halls, IT classrooms and teaching laboratories. The precise coverage will be dictated by the needs of the HEI, but such a breakdown by type of space is not required as part of this return, only the amount of floor space.

D17.C03

Teaching other

Figure for teaching space (not offices).

D18 Occupancy rate

Applies to teaching space under C03, as appropriate to the coverage of the space utilisation survey (see D17).

It should be noted that the definitions and accompanying good practice guidelines, are in accordance with the advice produced in the National Audit Office report 'Management of Space in Higher Education Institutions in Wales' (1996) http://www.nao.org.uk/publications/archive/9596.aspx.

The Occupancy rate represents the usage of teaching space as a percentage of total actual occupation. As an example, a room with a capacity of 20 may be occupied by 10 people during each hourly slot across the whole working day, which would be an occupancy rate of 50%. If, however, no people were in the room for each hourly slot between 9.00 am and 1.00 pm, and 10 people were in the room for each hourly slot between 1.00 pm and 5.00 pm, then the occupancy rate would still be 50% over the working day as the period between 9.00 am and 1.00 pm is not included as part of the actual occupation.

Capacity is recognised as difficult to determine precisely. The maximum realistic capacity of a room when in use for its normal function should be the basis for determining capacity. Thus, a seminar room that normally has furniture and a functional suitable capacity to accommodate 10 students should have a capacity measure of 10 irrespective of different arrangements for different group sizes. Where applicable, health and safety regulations should be used to support capacity assessments.

The measure of Occupancy rate that is required is as follows:

Survey-based approach

This approach is based on a physical count of people in rooms. It is necessary to base the measurement of occupancy on a 'standard core working day.' This is defined as the eight hour period of 9am to 5pm. Lunchtime periods and break periods are to be included in the analysis. The Occupancy rate should be standardised across this period, which may require the HEI to make adjustments. Thus, if existing information on occupancy runs from, say 8.30 am to 5.30 pm, then this should be adjusted to cover the period 9.00 am to 5.00pm.

Room booking/Timetabling approach

If actual occupancy information is not available, then standard group or module size information may be used. This may be generated from course details, or be on the basis of the group size the room has been booked for or is timetabled for use by. Thus, the expected size of a group that has booked a room may be 19 students and 1 member of staff, and the room in question has a capacity of 25. This information should be used as the basis for determining the occupancy rate for the room (20/25 = 80%).

It will be recognised that this data is likely to be less accurate than the Survey-based approach, as the actual numbers in the room will not be known, nor will it be known whether the room was actually used when booked out or timetabled for use. Nevertheless, each type of approach provides different insights into space use within an HEI, which may assist in managing space more effectively

In all cases, if there is a room that is not being occupied at a particular point in time during the survey but is still part of the survey, it should not form part of the analysis. Thus, if a room is occupied for half of one day, but not for the other half of the day, then the periods it is not in occupation should not be used in calculating overall occupancy.

The year and month that the survey or room booking/timetabled analysis - was carried out should be specified in the data return.

The following items are provided as general good practice guidance in carrying out the survey and analysis:

The survey period used

A full week period (Monday to Friday inclusive) should be used in collecting data, and should form the basis of the return. Factoring-up the results of a one-day survey is not acceptable for the return.

The time frame

A survey count based on an hourly frequency should be used, rather than, say, one count in the morning and one count in the afternoon. This will produce more accurate and usable results. Only data based upon an hourly count should be returned.

Counting method

In terms of accuracy, a full headcount method will be the most accurate (i.e. counting all people in a room). If it is not possible to use this method, then the next most accurate method is to carry out a headcount up to a specified level (for example, 40 people) and estimate numbers beyond this point. A third method is to assess if the room is full/empty in proportionate terms (e.g. 25% full, 25-50% full etc.). Other methods are available, but the above three indicate the range of options generally available. HEIs should choose an approach that suits their needs.

Scope of survey

It may not be possible to survey all the teaching space identified under D12/C03, as HEIs are likely to have various arrangements and management of space in place. However, it is recommended that both 'central' or 'pooled' space and 'local' or 'departmental' space is covered in a survey.

The area covered by the Occupancy rate survey (see D17) should be the same space used in making the frequency rate return (D16).

Also enter the basis of calculation of Occupancy rate - see D46.

D18.C03a

Teaching other

Teaching other: Occupancy rate

A percentage should be returned to one decimal place.

D18.C03b

Teaching other

Teaching other: Month of survey

Return a month in figures e.g. February = 02, October = 10.

D18.C03c

Teaching other

Teaching other: Year of survey

Return a four digit year e.g. 2009.

The year and month that the survey or room booking/timetable analysis was carried out should be specified in the data return. This should be the latest survey data.

D18.C14

Residential

The residential occupancy rate is measured by the proportion of the total letting period that the HEI's bedspaces are paid for throughout the letting year for resident students of the HEI. Thus, if 1,000 beds are let out for 32,000 'bedweeks' over a 36 week year, the occupancy rate would equal 32,000/(1000x36)=88.8%.

It is recognised that there may be different letting periods for different property and/or different types of student. It will therefore be necessary to provide a residential occupancy rate that is weighted to reflect these differences. The suggested method for providing this information is to divide the total number of 'bedweeks' sold by the total number of 'bedweeks' available over the academic letting period.

D19 Tenure

Report the proportion of total net internal area, including residential, under the HEI's direct management which is:

a) Held freehold

b) Held on an original lease with a term of 25 years or more (long leasehold)

c) Held on an original lease with a term of less than 25 years (leasehold)

d) Held on a licence or through an informal agreement. Include NHS space within the HEI's estate under this heading.

D19.C13a

Total non-residential

Tenure - % freehold. Figure for the non-residential estate.

D19.C13b

Total non-residential

Tenure - % long leasehold. Figure for the non-residential estate.

D19.C13c

Total non-residential

Tenure - % leasehold. Figure for the non-residential estate.

D19.C13d

Total non-residential

Tenure - % licence. Figure for the non-residential estate.

D19.C14a

Residential

Tenure - % freehold. Figure for the residential estate. Exclude any arrangements to take residential space for periods of less than a year.

D19.C14b

Residential

Tenure - % long leasehold. Figure for the residential estate. Exclude any arrangements to take residential space for periods of less than a year.

D19.C14c

Residential

Tenure - % leasehold. Figure for the residential estate. Exclude any arrangements to take residential space for periods of less than a year.

D19.C14d

Residential

Tenure - % licence. Figure for the residential estate. Exclude any arrangements to take residential space for periods of less than a year.

D19a % NIA PFI/PPP

Report the proportion of net internal area held under the terms of a PFI/PPP arrangement.

PFI = private finance initiative

PPP = public/private partnership

This may include space that falls under more than one of the tenure categories listed under D19 and is a subset of the D19 total, which must sum to 100%.

D19a.C13

Total non-residential

Report the proportion of non-residential net internal area, excluding residential, held under the terms of a PFI/PPP arrangement.

D19a.C14

Residential

Report the proportion of residential net internal area held under the terms of a PFI/PPP arrangement.

D20a Building condition assessment: condition definition

Define the % of total gross internal area which falls under the following condition assessment headings:

Condition A - As new condition

Features one or more of the following:

  • Typically built within the last five years, or may have undergone a major refurbishment within this period
  • Maintained/serviced to ensure fabric and building services replicate conditions at installation
  • No structural, building envelope, building services or statutory compliance issues apparent
  • No impacts upon operation of the building.

Condition B - Sound, operationally safe and exhibiting only minor deterioration

Typically features one or more of the following:

  • Maintenance will have been carried out
  • Minor deterioration to internal / external finishes
  • Few structural, building envelope, building services or statutory compliance issues apparent
  • Likely to have minor impacts upon the operation of the building.

Condition C - Operational, but major repair or replacement needed in the short to medium-term (generally 3 years)

Typically features one or more of the following:

  • Requiring replacement of building elements or services elements in the short to medium-term
  • Several structural, building envelope, building services or statutory compliance issues apparent, or one particularly significant issue apparent
  • Often including identified problems with building envelope (windows / roof etc.), building services (boilers, chillers etc.)
  • Likely to have major impacts upon the operation of the building, but still allow it to be operable.

Condition D - Inoperable, or serious risk of major failure or breakdown.

  • Building is inoperable, or likely to become inoperable, due to statutory compliance issues or condition representing a health and safety risk or breach
  • May be structural, building envelope, or building services problems coupled with compliance issues
  • The conditions are expected to curtail operations within the building (exclude very minor items which can be rectified easily).

The assessment of condition can be made at a building level or as a proportionate split between grades for a single building. It is required that the HEI specify which method was used (see D47).

The emphasis is upon the overall assessment of the building or parts of the building, rather than of individual elements within the building, such as services or building fabric. This overall assessment may require, or be based upon, elemental analysis, but the return is capturing the overall result of such an assessment.

The assessment should also relate to current year condition and state. Thus, if the roof is currently assessed as Condition C but the institution is aware that it will soon change to Condition D, it should still be assessed as Condition C.

Figures are required for both C13 Residential and C14 Total non-residential estate for each of the four conditions.

Elemental Based Assessment

There is benefit in carrying out building condition assessments on an elemental basis, and many HEIs currently do this. By way of guidance the details below are intended as a general outline of how such an approach could work.

It is not a requirement that this method is used. The method is simply additional guidance to assist HEIs in preparing a more detailed building condition assessment. Furthermore, it should not be seen as a replacement for any elemental approach that may currently be used by an HEI.

The elemental approach works from the same grades used in the existing definition (D20a), although it can relate to any set of grades. It is based on an assessment of each of the elements making up a building, which need to be aggregated to produce an overall grade assessment.

It is expected that the assessment will be based on a building by building analysis. The actual method would normally need to be identified.

The assessment of building condition should be based, as far as is possible, upon an assessment of the seven elements outlined in the Building condition assessment table and using the following methodology.

Each element should receive a 'weight', and the total weight should sum to 25 (An alternative sum total can be used if required). Four condition grades are attached to each element and a score associated with the grade. Each element is assessed in terms of the grade it is classed in, and the weight for the element multiplied by the score for the grade.

All the element scores are added together to identify a total score for the space. A range of total scores is used to assess the overall building condition of the space in question. The Building condition assessment table should make the above points clearer.

Using this approach the proportion of total gross internal area occupied and/or used by students and/or staff which is in each of the following grades would be produced:

Condition A - As new condition

Condition B - Sound, operationally safe and exhibiting only minor deterioration

Condition C - Operational, but major repair or replacement needed in the short to medium-term (typically within 3 years)

Condition D - Inoperable, or serious risk of major failure or breakdown

It will be necessary to apportion space ancillary to the function being graded (e.g. store cupboards, primary circulation, etc.) into the appropriate grades.

D20a.C13a

Total non-residential

Building condition % gross internal area: Condition A (As new condition).

Y

D20a.C13b

Total non-residential

Building condition % gross internal area: Condition B (Sound, operationally safe and exhibiting only minor deterioration).

Y

D20a.C13c

Total non-residential

Building condition % gross internal area: Condition C (Operational, but major repair or replacement needed in the short to medium-term).

Y

D20a.C13d

Total non-residential

Building condition % gross internal area: Condition D (Inoperable, or serious risk of major failure or breakdown).

Y

D20a.C14a

Residential

Building condition % gross internal area: Condition A (As new condition).

D20a.C14b

Residential

Building condition % gross internal area: Condition B (Sound, operationally safe and exhibiting only minor deterioration).

D20a.C14c

Residential

Building condition % gross internal area: Condition C (Operational, but major repair or replacement needed in the short to medium-term).

D20a.C14d

Residential

Building condition % gross internal area: Condition D (Inoperable, or serious risk of major failure or breakdown).

D20b Building condition assessment: cost to upgrade

This definition is based around the maintenance costs required to up-grade the whole estate to Condition B.

The costs should include ensuring legislative compliance (see D39a). Costs to upgrade should include professional fees, statutory fees, contingencies and VAT but should exclude inflation.

Define the cost to upgrade all space in Condition D to Condition B, and the cost to upgrade all space in Condition C to Condition B.

A building or proportion of building could be classed, for example, as Condition C relative to original condition gradings but would have the additional notation identifying costs necessary at today's figures to return the building to Condition B. This may result in the condition grade C-675,000 for example.

This provides a summary of building condition through grading but also an indication of cost scale/magnitude to rectify. It also enables the difference between planned maintenance and overall 'backlog' works to be reconciled.

D20b.C13a

Total non-residential

Building condition cost to upgrade from Condition D to B. Figure for the non-residential estate.

Y

D20b.C13b

Total non-residential

Building condition cost to upgrade from Condition C to B. Figure for the non-residential estate.

Y

D20b.C14a

Residential

Building condition to upgrade from Condition D to B. Figure for the residential estate.

D20b.C14b

Residential

Building condition to upgrade from Condition C to B. Figure for the residential estate.

D21 Functional suitability

Functional suitability measures the capability of the space to support its existing function. If the space is vacant, the indicator will assume the last use of that space. If space is temporarily vacant (e.g. due to refurbishment), the same assumption applies.

Measure the proportion of total gross internal area which is in each of the following four categories. (The sum of the four percentages will be the total gross internal area for the HEI):

Grade 1 Excellent - the room(s) / building(s) fully support current functions. There are no negative impacts upon the functions taking place in the space. (The space is highly suitable for current functions).

Grade 2 Good - the room(s) / building(s) provides a good environment for the current function in all or most respects. There may be shortfalls in certain areas, but these have only a minor effect upon current functions. (The space is suitable for current functions).

Grade 3 Fair - the room(s) / building(s) provides a reasonable environment for current functions in many respects, but has a number of shortfalls. These shortfalls may be causing mismatches between space and function that is having a more significant effect upon current functions than Grade 2 rooms. (The space is generally unsuitable for current functions).

Grade 4 Poor - the room(s) / building(s) fail to support current functions and/or are unsuitable for current use. The operational problems associated with such space are major, and are constraining current functions in the space. Space in this grade may require alternative solutions, rather than straightforward improvements in particular features of the space. (The space is very unsuitable for current function).

The following are examples of factors that may need to be considered in setting the functional suitability grade for the room/building, although they should not be seen as prescriptive:

  • Environment: The internal room(s)/area(s) environment in terms of temperature, humidity, fresh air, clean air (if required), lighting levels, day-lighting
  • Layout/plan: Layout of room(s)/area(s) relative to equipment used, ancillary and related room functions, furniture, circulation and access
  • Location: The physical location of the room(s)/area(s) relative to the activities that need to use the space, and other spaces these activities need to use
  • Flexibility: Intrinsic ability of room(s)/area(s) to be altered, amended or changed in terms of size, environment and layout in response to changing demand - this will be a factor of structural and building services design
  • Servicing requirements: Ability of the room(s)/area(s) fittings, furniture and equipment to meet the identified business demands of the users, such as electrical capacity, data points, etc.
  • User perception: The decorative, aesthetic and cosmetic qualities of the room/area from the perspective of users
  • General external Environment: The quality of external surroundings and settings. This could include factors such as footpath and lighting quality, security perception, building and site appearance, and signage.

In addition, the results of the assessment of legislative compliance (D39a) and energy performance (D38a) should be considered in determining the overall functional suitability of a room or building.

There is no prescribed way in which all of the above factors should be combined to produce an overall assessment of functional suitability. However, the 'element-based' assessment described under D20a Building condition may be used as guidance on how an overall assessment could be produced.

Nevertheless, it will be for individual HEIs to decide how best to assess overall functional suitability.

The assessment using the 'element based' approach would be based upon an assessment of the following factors:

  • Legislative compliance
  • Energy performance
  • Environment
  • Layout/plan
  • Location
  • Flexibility
  • Servicing requirements
  • User perception
  • General external environment
  • Each factor should receive a 'weight', and the total weight should sum to 25 (An alternative sum total can be used if required). One of four functional suitability grades can be applied to each factor and a score should be assigned to each grade (The scoring system can be determined by the HEI).

A weighted score is then derived for each factor by multiplying the weight by the functional suitability grade score. The table at the end of this definition illustrates how this might operate, with purely notional weights attached to each factor. As an illustration, energy performance has been assigned a weight of 3, and the room/area in question is deemed to be of Grade 2, which has a score of 8. The weight of 3 is multiplied by the grade score of 8, to give an overall weighted score of 24 for that particular room/area.

All the factor scores are added together to identify a total score for the room/area in question. An average score for all the rooms/areas across the estate could be derived to produce an overall functional suitability score for the whole estate. (See the table at the end of this definition for further guidance on this).

Ideally functional suitability analysis should be built up from room/area or floor level. However, in practice it may be more realistic to develop a score based upon building level analysis. HEIs should adopt an approach that best suits their capabilities.

It is recommended that users are actively involved in the assessment of functional suitability. This is important to ensure that an appropriate assessment is made.

The assessment should be based on current use and functions, not anticipated requirements in the future, due to factors such as student growth.

In this Example Functional Suitability Score the results relate to a particular building. From this, the overall functional suitability score for the building can be calculated as follows:

Grade 1 score = 110 (Layout/plan weight of 4 x Grade 1 score of 10 = 40

Location weight of 2 x Grade 1 score of 10 = 20

Flexibility weight of 2 x Grade 1 score of 10 = 20

User Perception weight of 3 x Grade 1 score of 10 = 30)

Grade 2 score = 96 (legislative compliance weight of 3 x Grade 2 score of 8 = 24 etc.)

Total score = 212. Therefore overall grade for the building is Functional suitability Grade 1 (which has been classed as a room/area with a weighted score of between 200 and 250).

The outputs of the above process can be used to derive the functional suitability score of the overall estate. As a hypothetical illustration, the following table may be helpful:

This Functional Suitability illustration shows that 30% of the estate is in Grade 1 functional suitability, 20% is in Grade 2, and 50% is in Grade 3. This approach can be applied at a room/area level to provide a more precise assessment of the overall functional suitability of an estate, but this will depend upon individual capabilities within HEIs.

D21.C13a

Total non-residential

Functional suitability % gross internal area: suitability Grade 1 (Excellent).

Y

D21.C13b

Total non-residential

Functional suitability % gross internal area: suitability Grade 2 (Good).

Y

D21.C13c

Total non-residential

Functional suitability % gross internal area: suitability Grade 3 (Fair).

Y

D21.C13d

Total non-residential

Functional suitability % gross internal area: suitability Grade 4 (Poor).

Y

D21.C14a

Residential

Functional suitability % gross internal area: suitability Grade 1 (Excellent).

D21.C14b

Residential

Functional suitability % gross internal area: suitability Grade 2 (Good).

D21.C14c

Residential

Functional suitability % gross internal area: suitability Grade 3 (Fair).

D21.C14d

Residential

Functional suitability % gross internal area: suitability Grade 4 (Poor).

D22 Date of construction

Approximate year of construction of the predominant part of the building, by gross internal area. Where buildings have been substantially reconstructed, the date of construction should reflect the year of that reconstruction.

Give percentage of total gross internal area originally constructed in each of the following periods:

% GIA, since 1980

% GIA, 1960-1979

% GIA, 1940-1959

% GIA, 1914-1939

% GIA, 1840-1914

% GIA, built before 1840

To supply this data it will be necessary to record the age of each building.

D22.C13a

Total non-residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built since 1980.

 

D22.C13b

Total non-residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built 1960-1979.

 

D22.C13c

Total non-residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built 1940-1959.

 

D22.C13d

Total non-residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built 1914-1939.

 

D22.C13e

Total non-residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built 1840-1914.

 

D22.C13f

Total non-residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built before 1840.

 

D22.C14a

Residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built since 1980.

 

D22.C14b

Residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built 1960-1979.

 

D22.C14c

Residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built 1940-1959.

 

D22.C14d

Residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built 1914-1939.

 

D22.C14e

Residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built 1840-1914.

 

D22.C14f

Residential

Construction date % gross internal area: built before 1840.

 

D23 Number of bedspaces

The number of beds available to students of the HEI during the academic year, where these beds are the direct financial responsibility of the HEI. (This information will be linked with the income data provided in D01/C14, and so these data sources should be compatible).

Exclude bedspaces where the financial relationship is between students and some other party (e.g. a private landlord), bedspaces given over to commercial letting through the academic year and bedspaces taken by members of staff who act as wardens in staff residences.

 

D23.C14

Residential

Figure for the residential estate.

D23a Number of third party bedspaces

Estimated number of third party bedspaces occupied by students from the HEI. This will include those covered by hard and soft nomination agreements, but should only include those in purpose-built/modified buildings of at least 10 bedspaces.

A formal agreement should be in place with the provider, although there need not be a guaranteed number of bedspaces for one particular HEI and the agreement may encompass more than one HEI. Typically the relevant bedspaces will be advertised in the HEI's prospectus.

1 December (or a convenient nearby date) should be taken to ascertain the actual number of occupied bedspaces.

D23a.C14

Residential

Figure for the residential estate.

D24 Insurance replacement value

This is the current cost of re-building the property to a standard similar to that of the existing, subject to appropriate allowances being made for any extra work which may be required as a result of physical conditions or statutory provisions, such as changes in building regulations.

The figure should be adjusted to include demolition and site clearance, the effect of special site restrictions, professional fees and VAT. Exclude the value of contents and terrorism. Exclude leasehold property where the landlord insures.

D24.C13

Total non-residential

The value for which the non-residential estate is insured.

Y

D24.C14

Residential

The value for which the residential estate is insured.

D24.C01

Total HEI

The value for which the whole estate is insured. Sum total of C13 and C14.

D25 Capital expenditure on estates and buildings

This data will be provided by HESA. These figures will be used as a cross-check for consistency only.

Numbers are required for the last three financial years and resulting ratios will be presented as rolling averages.

A further breakdown of capital expenditure is required for the most recent year, which must be based upon and agree with the HESA Finance Statistics Return (part of the Finance Statistics Return with Higher Education Business and Community Interaction Survey) as described in C01..

The combination of expenditure data under C13 (a) and (b) and C14(a) and (b) must equal the capital expenditure return made to HESA.

D25.C13

Total non-residential

This figure will be provided by HESA and will be used as a cross-check for consistency only.

Capital expenditure on the total non-residential estate (including catering capital expenditure).

D25.C14

Residential

This figure will be provided by HESA and will be used as a cross-check for consistency only.

Capital expenditure on the residential estate.

D25.C01

Total HEI

This figure will be provided by HESA and will be used as a cross-check for consistency only.

Capital expenditure on the whole estate. This will correspond to Table 8 (Heads 1a and 2a) of the Finance Statistics Return (part of the HESA Finance Statistics Return with Higher Education Business and Community Interaction Survey). Sum total of C13 and C14.

D25.C13a

Total non-residential

This figure, along with C13b, is part of C13 above and the two figures should total C13.

Capital expenditure on non-residential estates: new building works (includes extensions and net additions to floor space, e.g. mezzanine floors).

D25.C13b

Total non-residential

This figure, along with C13a, is part of C13 above and the two figures should total C13.

Capital expenditure on the non-residential estate: all other expenditure (includes major refurbishments).

D25.C14a

Residential

This figure, along with C14b, is part of C14 above and the two figures should total C14.

Capital expenditure on the residential estate: new building works.

D25.C14b

Residential

This figure, along with C14a, is part of C14 above and the two figures should total C14.

Capital expenditure on the residential estate: all other expenditure.

D26 Total property costs

The total revenue costs of occupying space held for an estate, site or building.

Best estimates based on an apportionment are both acceptable and expected. Enter the general method of apportionment the institution used as described under D42.

The following costs should be added together to derive total property costs:

  1. Rateable value (RV) (as a proxy for rental value, which will take into account the differences between leasehold and freehold properties and between different valuation policies). Non-residential properties only. Also referred to in this document as D27.
  2. Rates paid (excluding any rates rebates following a successful appeal - but including rates relief). Non-residential properties only. Also referred to in this document as D28.
  3. Insurance premiums paid. Also referred to in this document as D29.
  4. Net service charge. Also referred to in this document as D30.
  5. Energy costs. Also referred to in this document as D31.
  6. Water and sewerage costs. Also referred to in this document as D32.
  7. Maintenance costs. Also referred to in this document as D33.
  8. Cleaning costs. Also referred to in this document as D34.
  9. Internally-incurred estate management costs. Also referred to in this document as D35(a).
  10. External estate management costs. Also referred to in this document as D36(a).

D26.C04

Teaching total

Total property costs including RV - Teaching

D26.C07

Research total

Total property costs including RV - Research

D26.C10

Support total

Total property costs including RV - Support

D26.C11

Vacant non-residential

Total property costs including RV - Vacant non-residential

D26.C12

Other non-residential

Total property costs including RV - Other non-residential

D26.C13

Total non-residential

Total property costs including RV - Total non-residential. Sum total of D27.C13, D28.C13, D29.C13, D30.C13, D31.C13, D32.C13, D33.C13, D34.C13, D35.C13a, D36.C13a.

D26.C14

Residential

Total property costs NOT including RV or rates paid - Residential

D26.C01

Total HEI

Total property costs including RV. Sum total of D27.C13, D28.C13, C29.C01, D30.C01, D31.C01, D32.C01, D33.C01, D34.C01, D35.C01a, D36.C01a.

D27 Rateable value

The current rateable value of all occupied space held at the end of the relevant year.

Include:

  • Rateable value of vacant space
  • The effects of any rating appeals determined before the end of the financial year but ignore outstanding appeals.

Exclude rateable value on space let out to sub-tenants if the tenant pays the rates.

Residential properties do not attract rates (unless used for lettings for more than 140 days/year) and therefore typically have no rateable value.

Note: Rateable values are very important in the preparation of Key Estate Ratios since these are the only consistently available data item to use as a proxy for rent or for use of capital. Its chief advantage is that numbers are available across all property types (excluding residential) and for both freehold and leasehold tenures.

D27.C13

Total non-residential

Figure for the total non-residential estate only.

D28 Rates paid

The actual rates paid in the commercial year. This should exclude the effects of any rates rebate following an appeal, but not the effects of rates relief due to charitable status or similar.

D28.C13

Total non-residential

Figure for the total non-residential estate only.

D29 Insurance premium

The annual costs of premiums for insuring the premises to include all building insurance, contents and business interruption policies, including any relevant brokerage fees. The total should include premiums for terrorism, liability under the Health and Safety at Work regulations, flood, burst pipes, subsidence, fire, explosion and insurance premium tax.

Exclusions relate to:

  • An overall insurance policy including loss of trade
  • Public liability insurance (if cover relating to loss or damage to property or similar terms can be identified separately, this should be included in D29)
  • Damage to or theft of computers if covered by a separate policy to content policies.

D29.C13

Total non-residential

Total figure for the total non-residential estate.

D29.C14

Residential

Total figure for the residential estate.

D29.C01

Total HEI

Total figure for the whole estate. Sum total of C13 and C14.

D30 Net service charge/miscellaneous PFI/PPP costs

The annual payments to an external landlord for the delivery of services under the terms of a lease less service charge income from external tenants/miscellaneous PFI/PPP costs, which cannot be allocated under any other EMS cost category.

Items included in the service charge vary according to lease terms but may include cleaning, heating, repairs, etc.

Wherever possible, PFI/PPP costs should be disaggregated and allocated along service lines and in all cases the PFI/PPP should be approached in the first instance to obtain a breakdown of their costs. However, where the provider is unable or unwilling to do so, perhaps because they are not contractually obliged to do so, any costs that cannot be broken down should be included under this heading in order to obtain an accurate picture of the total property cost.

D30.C13

Total non-residential

Total figure for the non-residential estate.

D30.C14

Residential

Total figure for the residential estate.

D30.C01

Total HEI

Total figure for the whole estate. Sum total of C13 and C14.

D31 Energy costs

The combined costs of supply of all energy sources (e.g. oil, gas and electricity) in a financial year (see D38a for a fuller definition of LPG and district heating).

Break downs are requested for the following component energy sources below:

  • Oil
  • Gas
  • Electricity
  • Coal
  • Steam/hot water
  • Other fuels including district heating, liquefied petroleum gas, solar power etc.

Exclude energy management system upkeep costs. These should be included under Maintenance costs (D33).

Exclude costs of energy supplies to any space that does not fall within the total floorspace figures as well as any maintenance or improvement expenditure.

D31.C13a

Total non-residential

Energy costs for the total non-residential estate - Oil.

D31.C13b

Total non-residential

Energy costs for the total non-residential estate - Gas.

D31.C13c

Total non-residential

Energy costs for the total non-residential estate - Electricity.

D31.C13d

Total non-residential

Energy costs for the total non-residential estate - Coal.

D31.C13e

Total non-residential

Energy costs for the total non-residential estate - Steam/hot water.

D31.C13f

Total non-residential

Energy costs for the total non-residential estate - Other fuels.

D31.C13

Total non-residential

Energy costs for the total non-residential estate - all fuels. Sum total of figures entered for the above for oil, gas, electricity, coal, steam/hot water and other fuels for the total non-residential estate.

D31.C14a

Residential

Energy costs for the residential estate - Oil.

D31.C14b

Residential

Energy costs for the residential estate - Gas.

D31.C14c

Residential

Energy costs for the residential estate - Electricity.

D31.C14d

Residential

Energy costs for the residential estate - Coal.

D31.C14e

Residential

Energy costs for the residential estate - Steam/hot water.

D31.C14f

Residential

Energy costs for the residential estate - Other fuels.

D31.C14

Residential

Energy costs for the residential estate - all fuels. Sum total of figures entered for the above for oil, gas, electricity, coal, steam/hot water and other fuels for the residential estate.

D31.C01a

Total HEI

Total energy costs for the whole estate - Oil. Sum total of figure entered for C14 residential estate - Oil and C13 total non-residential estate - Oil.

D31.C01b

Total HEI

Total energy costs for the whole estate - Gas. Sum total of figure entered for C14 residential estate - Gas and C13 total non-residential estate - Gas.

D31.C01c

Total HEI

Total energy costs for the whole estate - Electricity. Sum total of figure entered for C14 residential estate - Electricity and C13 total non-residential estate - Electricity.

D31.C01d

Total HEI

Total energy costs for the whole estate - Coal. Sum total of figure entered for C14 residential estate - Coal and C13 total non-residential estate - Coal.

D31.C01e

Total HEI

Total energy costs for the whole estate - Steam/hot water. Sum total of figure entered for C14 residential estate - Steam/hot water and C13 total non-residential estate - Steam/hot water.

D31.C01f

Total HEI

Total energy costs for the whole estate - Other fuels. Sum total of figure entered for C14 residential estate - Other fuels and C13 total non-residential estate - Other fuels.

D31.C01

Total HEI

Total energy costs for the whole estate - All fuels. Sum total of the six C01 totals above.

D32 Water and sewerage costs

The costs of supplying and treating water and sewage respectively in a financial year. Include metered water supply, sewerage charge, trade effluent charge and water rates.

Break downs are requested for water and sewerage.

D32a Water costs

D32.C13a

Total non-residential

Water costs for the total non-residential estate.

D32.C14a

Residential

Water costs for the residential estate.

D32.C01a

Total HEI

Total water costs for the whole estate. Sum total of C13a and C14a.

D32b Sewerage costs

D32.C13b

Total non-residential

Sewerage costs for the total non-residential estate.

D32.C14b

Residential

Sewerage costs for the residential estate.

D32.C01b

Total HEI

Total sewerage costs for the estate. Sum total of C13b and C14b.

D32.C13

Total non-residential

Total water/sewerage costs for the total non-residential estate. Sum total of C13a Water costs and C13b Sewerage costs.

D32.C14

Residential

Total water/sewerage costs for the residential estate. Sum total of C14a Water costs and C14b Sewerage costs.

D32.C01

Total HEI

Total water/sewerage costs for the whole estate. Sum total of C13 Total water/sewerage costs for the total non-residential estate and C14 Total water/sewerage costs for the residential estate.

D33 Maintenance costs

All revenue expenditure costs associated with the on-going repair and maintenance of the estate. (It may include costs that fall below a certain HEI-specific spending threshold). This will be for the HEI as a whole, not just the estates department. Include the costs of maintenance and repair on all buildings, roads, grounds and playing fields as follows:

  • Staff costs (salary, national insurance, pension contributions, and the value of other benefits as notified to Inland Revenue)
  • Staff time associated with the direct supervision of repair and maintenance work but exclude the costs of 'top level' management time spent on budget setting and overall control
  • Direct support costs related to expenses, computing (excluding hardware), communications and consumables associated with maintenance and repair (rents, rates and service charges are not required)
  • Costs of materials
  • Cost of legislative compliance
  • Costs of external consultants and contractors associated with maintenance work
  • Minor works expenditure where these are treated as revenue expenditure, and have not been included in the return of D25 Capital expenditure
  • Actual expenditure associated with long-term maintenance plans.

Specifically exclude any costs included under the headings of internally or externally incurred estate management costs at D35a/D36a and any depreciation on capital costs of equipment.

The distinction between capital expenditure and maintenance revenue expenditure will be a matter for HEIs to determine, in line with the requirements of the Financial Reporting Group http://http://www.bufdg.ac.uk/special/financial_reporting/?a=cm". However, under Capital expenditure (D25) there is guidance on the break down required under this heading. For reference, it should be noted that the total figure for capital expenditure returned under D25 should be the same as the Capital expenditure return made to HESA. This, along with the definition of maintenance under this heading (D33), should ensure compatibility with HESA returns for the topics of maintenance and capital expenditure.

It is important, however, that care is taken to avoid double-counting between the Capital expenditure return made to HESA (D25) and the Maintenance expenditure return made under the above definition (D33).

The combination of total Maintenance revenue expenditure (as returned under D33) and Capital expenditure as returned to HESA (D25), should result in the total building works related expenditure for the HEI. It is recognised, however, that there may be some inaccuracies using these sources, but they should still give a reasonable picture of these elements of property costs over time.

The figures should be further broken down into the following categories:

  • Building maintenance (Planned maintenance and Reactive maintenance)
  • Grounds maintenance
  • Playing fields maintenance.

Definitions for these types of maintenance are below.

Building maintenance definition

Work undertaken to keep and restore every part of a building, its services and surrounds (including underground installations). This is split into Planned and Reactive maintenance as defined below, and a return on each is requested. (If this is not possible, a single figure for Building maintenance should be returned).

Planned maintenance

Planned building maintenance is any work done with forethought and control to a predetermined plan, even on a day-to-day basis. This will include:

  • Day to day or routine maintenance
  • Periodic or cyclical maintenance
  • Maintenance contracts (scheduled and condition based maintenance)
  • Preventative maintenance (also planned preventative maintenance and forward maintenance)
  • Regular statutory inspections;
  • Painting / decorating programmes
  • Adaptation (such as re-location, change of use, alterations and minor refurbishment) that have not been included in part of the D25 Capital expenditure return
  • Long term maintenance (irregular or backlog maintenance).

Reactive maintenance

Reactive building maintenance is carried out in response to unplanned breakdowns and emergencies. This will include:

  • Unplanned maintenance
  • Emergency or breakdown maintenance
  • Responsive maintenance.

With Term Maintenance contracts and Total Facilities management contracts, Reactive maintenance costs are costs of unforeseen break downs and ad hoc occupier requests for building maintenance, under the direct control of the contractor.

Grounds maintenance definition

Work undertaken to keep and restore an HEI's campus or building's grounds including hard and soft landscaping, car parking and highways not part of the building per se and not categorised as playing fields. A single figure for Grounds maintenance should be returned.

Soft landscaping incorporates the up-keep and installation of all planting, shrubs, flowers, window boxes, borders, lawns, and internal plants and flowers.

Hard landscaping incorporates the up-keep of features such as roads, footways and car parks. Includes snow/litter clearance and gritting and road improvements.

Playing field maintenance definition

Work undertaken to keep and restore an HEI's campus or building's associated playing fields including any directly associated hard or soft landscaping.

D33a

D33.C13a

Total non-residential

Buildings planned - total figure for the non-residential estate.

D33b

D33.C13b

Total non-residential

Buildings reactive - total figure for the non-residential estate.

D33c

D33.C13c

Total non-residential

Buildings total - total figure for the total non-residential estate. Sum total for non-residential estate: Buildings planned and Buildings reactive.

D33d

D33.C13d

Total non-residential

Grounds - total figure for the total non-residential estate.

D33e

D33.C13e

Total non-residential

Playing fields - total figure for the total non-residential estate.

D33.C13

Total non-residential

Total figure for the non-residential estate. Sum total for the total non-residential estate: Buildings planned and reactive, grounds and playing fields.

D33a

D33.C14a

Residential

Buildings planned - total figure for the residential estate.

D33b

D33.C14b

Residential

Buildings reactive - total figure for the residential estate:

D33c

D33.C14c

Residential

Buildings total - total figure for the residential estate. Sum total for residential estate: Buildings planned and Buildings reactive.

D33d

D33.C14d

Residential

Grounds - total figure for the residential estate.

D33e

D33.C14e

Residential

Playing fields - total figure for the residential estate.

D33.C14

Residential

Total figure for the residential estate. Sum total for the residential estate: Buildings planned and reactive, grounds and playing fields.

D33a

D33.C01a

Total HEI

Buildings planned - total figure for the whole estate.

D33b

D33.C01b

Total HEI

Buildings reactive - total figure for the whole estate.

D33c

D33.C01c

Total HEI

Buildings total - total figure for the whole estate: Buildings planned and reactive.

D33d

D33.C01d

Total HEI

Grounds - total figure for the whole estate.

D33e

D33.C01e

Total HEI

Playing fields - total figure for the whole estate.

D33.C01

D33.C01

Total HEI

Total figure for the whole estate. Sum total for the whole estate: Buildings planned and reactive, grounds and playing fields.

D34 Cleaning costs

Actual revenue costs of all regular and routine cleaning of internal and external spaces, including the cleaning of furniture and windows (internal and external), rubbish picking duties, janitorial staffing (if directly associated with cleaning), etc. Include also the costs of refuse and general waste disposal, but not water sewerage or trade effluent. Costs should be made up as follows :

  • Staff costs (salary, national insurance, pension contributions, and the value of other perquisites as presented to Inland Revenue)
  • Staff costs associated with the direct supervision of cleaning but exclude the costs of 'top level' management time spent on budget setting and overall control
  • Direct support costs (rent, rates, service charges, expenses, computing, communications and consumables) associated with cleaning
  • Materials required for cleaning
  • Costs of external contractors.

Specifically exclude any costs included under the heading of estate management costs and the costs of cleaning catering installations, mechanical and electrical services, items included elsewhere (e.g. grounds maintenance), vending machine support.

Costs should be split between:

  • Internal cleaning costs
  • External cleaning costs.

The cleaning of windows (both internal and external) should be classed as an internal cleaning cost. External cleaning costs should only relate to external areas routinely cleaned, which may not include the whole estate. The cleaning costs for C13 below should relate to the area cleaned figures provided under D15.

D34a Internal cleaning costs

D34.C13a

Total non-residential

Total figure for the non-residential estate.

D34b External cleaning costs

D34.C13b

Total non-residential

Total figure for the non-residential estate.

D34.C13

Total non-residential

Cleaning costs - total figure for the non-residential estate. Sum total of Internal and External cleaning costs totals for the non-residential estate.

D34a Internal cleaning costs

D34.C14a

Residential

Total figure for the residential estate.

D34b External cleaning costs

D34.C14b

Residential

Total figure for the residential estate.

D34.C14

Residential

Cleaning costs - total figure for the residential estate. Sum total of Internal and External cleaning costs totals for the residential estate.

D34a Internal cleaning costs

D34.C01a

Total HEI

Total internal cleaning costs figure for the whole estate. Sum total of D34.C13a and D34.C14a.

D34b External cleaning costs

D34.C01b

Total HEI

Total external cleaning costs for the whole estate. Sum total of D34.C13b and D34.C14b.

D34.C01

Total HEI

Total cleaning costs for the whole estate. Sum total of total Internal and External cleaning costs for the non-residential estate and Internal and External costs for the total residential estate.

D35 Internally-incurred property management costs

Internally-incurred costs associated with all property management activities. Costs should be split into three mutually exclusive categories:

D35 (a) Internally-incurred Estate management costs

D35 (b) Internally-incurred Facilities management costs

D35 (c) Internally-incurred Project management costs

Include the following costs for each category of management:

  • Staff costs (salary, national insurance, pension contributions, and the value of other perquisites as presented to Inland Revenue). Include the staffing costs of those outside the estates department (but within the HEI) who do work of this kind.
  • Direct office running costs associated with relevant management functions (support staff - such as departmental secretaries, equipment, expenses, communications and consumables).

If any staff categories or activities fall across more than one of the three management categories, then an apportionment of costs will be necessary. This might include purchasing clerks, administrative managers, payroll clerks etc.

Clarification on staff/costs can be found in the Allocation of staff/costs table.

Interpretation Guidance

The emphasis of D35 is to capture 'high level' internal property management costs. However, this is not appropriate for all categories of property management as it would result in certain costs not being captured. This guidance therefore sets out to make clear what staff costs should be captured in each category of 'management', as well as commenting on how they relate to operational costs.

As a general guide, the staff costs captured in D35 should relate through to the staff numbers captured under D37.

Below are a series of categories of 'management'. They are intended solely as a guide to the type of person/activity that might fall within these levels of management, and hence how they should be treated in terms of definition D35. However, it will remain a matter of judgement by the HEI how to assign people to the various categories and so these notes should be treated as aiding that process rather than being prescriptive.

High Level Management

High level management is taken to include those staff charged with developing policy and/or strategic operational activities, and/or major staff management responsibilities. This is likely to include the Director of Estates/Facilities, Assistant Directors, Senior Specialists. This list is not exhaustive. This is the category of staff that are likely to form the sole or main input to the staff cost definition D35, unless otherwise stated. Other staff costs should, as appropriate, be allocated elsewhere in the operational cost definitions, or externally provided staff management costs (D36).

Middle Management

Middle Management is taken to include staff with a responsibility for the implementation of policy and/or management of operations. There may, in addition, be functional staff management responsibilities, such as being responsible for a particular team or activity area. This is likely to include architects, engineers, surveyors, planners and administrative officers. Such staff would normally be included within the appropriate operational cost definition.

Thus, an M&E (mechanical and electrical) engineer responsible for the minor works programme would be likely to have costs allocated under D33 Total maintenance.

The exceptions to this may be those staff who have a sole or proportionate engagement in estate strategy, landlord and tenant or similar activities. Unless these activities can be assigned to another operational cost definition, such as D33 Total maintenance, then they will need to be captured under the appropriate staff management cost definition. For strategy and landlord and tenant work this would be D35a.

Direct Management/Supervisors

Direct Managers and/or Supervisors are taken to be those staff which have day-to-day management of appropriate operational staff. These staff costs should be returned under the appropriate operational costs heading.

Administrative Support

Administrative staff include secretaries, clerical staff, technical staff, administrators etc. They are responsible for supporting the activities of the estate and facilities staff, be they managers or operational staff. They should be apportioned across estate management, facilities management, project management and operational costs, as far as considered appropriate.

Operational Staff

Operational staff includes carpenters, electricians and building and maintenance personnel. This list is not exhaustive. This category of staff would normally be captured under the appropriate operational definition. As an example, cleaning staff costs (excluding managers and supervisors) would be captured under D34.

D35a Internally-incurred Estate management costs

This category should include all costs (both 'high level' and other appropriate staff and associated costs for this activity) associated with estates strategy and planning, all landlord and tenant matters, acquisition and sales, rating, buildings insurance, energy, water and sewerage, and landscaping, repair and maintenance and internal moves.

In the case of estates strategy and planning, landlord and tenant matters, purchases and sales, rating and buildings insurance, these costs are likely to cover all staff. For energy, water and sewerage, landscaping, repair and maintenance - including major revenue projects - and internal moves, costs are for 'high level' staff and associated costs. This should include all staff not responsible for supervising or undertaking these activities directly.

Include legal costs of estate management work.

D35.C13a

Total non-residential

Internally-incurred Estate management costs for the total non-residential estate.

D35.C14a

Residential

Internally-incurred Estate management costs for the residential estate.

D35.C01a

Total HEI

Internally-incurred Estate management costs for the total HEI. Sum total of Internally-incurred Estate management costs for the total non-residential estate and Internally-incurred Estate management costs for the residential estate.

D35b Internally-incurred Facilities management costs

This category should include all staff and associated costs that support the occupancy of the estate, other than the operational facilities costs. This will include the costs of management and administration (not supervision) of cleaning, security and porterage, reception services, post room and internal distribution services (refer to D60 for further details on the definition of the above activities) and help-desk management. (Note: this definition excludes other activities that may be classed as facilities management, such as telephone costs. These operational and management costs should therefore be excluded from this return).

Include legal costs of facilities management work.

D35.C13b

Total non-residential

Internally-incurred Facilities management costs for the total non-residential estate.

D35.C14b

Residential

Internally-incurred Facilities management costs for the residential estate.

D35.C01b

Total HEI

Internally-incurred Facilities management costs for the total HEI. Sum total of Internally-incurred Facilities management costs for the total non-residential estate and Internally-incurred Facilities management costs for the residential estate.

D35c Internally-incurred Project management costs

This category should include all the staff and associated costs required to plan for and justify capital and revenue projects (including capital bids) and designing and/or project managing the work. (This combination of costs should therefore cover all staff associated with this activity).

Construction costs should not be included here.

Include legal costs of project management work.

Note: the combination of management costs and operational costs (see D61, D62 etc.) should capture all relevant property management costs for the relevant category of activity. Thus, the costs of managing the activities listed under the 'estate management' heading need to be captured, along with the costs of the activities themselves. Apart from facilities management, therefore, coverage of costs should be comprehensive.

D35.C13c

Total non-residential

Internally-incurred Project management costs for the total non-residential estate.

D35.C14c

Residential

Internally-incurred Project management costs for the residential estate.

D35.C01c

Total HEI

Internally-incurred Project management costs for the total HEI. Sum total of Internally-incurred Project management costs for the total non-residential estate and Internally-incurred Project management costs for the residential estate.

D35.C13

Total non-residential

Internally-incurred Property management costs for the total non-residential estate. Sum total of Internally-incurred Estate management costs for the total non-residential estate, Internally-incurred Facilities management costs for the total non-residential estate and Internally-incurred Project management costs for the total non-residential estate.

D35.C14

Residential

Internally-incurred Property management costs for the residential estate. Sum total of Internally-incurred Estate management costs for the residential estate, Internally-incurred Facilities management costs for the residential estate and Internally-incurred Project management costs for the residential estate.

D35.C01

Total HEI

Internally-incurred Property management costs for the total HEI. Sum total of Internally-incurred Estate management costs for the total HEI, Internally-incurred Facilities management costs for the total HEI and Internally-incurred Project management costs for the total HEI.

D36 Externally-provided property management costs

Externally-provided costs associated with all property management activities. Costs should be split into three categories, consistently with the cost break down in D35.

D36a Externally-provided Estate management costs

D36b Externally-provided Facilities management costs

D36c Externally-provided Project management costs

D36a Externally-provided Estate management costs

The revenue costs of external consultants and contractors associated with estates strategy and planning, all landlord and tenant matters, purchases and sales, rating, buildings insurance, energy, water and sewerage, landscaping, repair and maintenance (including fit-out, improvements and internal moves). Include legal costs of estate management work.

 

D36.C13a

Total non-residential

Externally-provided Estate management costs for the total non-residential estate.

 

D36.C14a

Residential

Externally-provided Estate management costs for the residential estate.

 

D36.C01a

Total HEI

Externally-provided Estate management costs for the total HEI. Sum total of Externally-provided Estate management costs for the total non-residential estate and Externally-provided Estate management costs for the residential estate.

 

D36b Externally-provided Facilities management costs

This category should include all revenue costs associated with activities that support the occupancy of the estate.

This will include all staff and associated costs in relation to the high level management and administration (not supervision) of cleaning, security and porterage, reception services, post room and internal distribution services and transport (refer to D60 for further details on the definition of the above activities). Include legal costs of facilities management work.

 

D36.C13b

Total non-residential

Externally-provided Facilities management costs for the total non-residential estate.

 

D36.C14b

Residential

Externally-provided Facilities management costs for the residential estate.

 

D36.C01b

Total HEI

Externally-provided Facilities management costs for the total HEI. Sum total of Externally-provided Facilities management costs for the total non-residential estate and Externally-provided Facilities management costs for the residential estate.

 

D36c Externally-provided Project management costs

This category should include all the costs required to plan for and justify capital and revenue projects (including capital bids) and of designing and/or project managing the work where these do not form part of the contractor appointment. The costs should not include construction costs or similar. Include legal costs of project management work.

If external estate, facilities and project management costs cannot be distinguished from operational costs, then include the actual costs under D25, D26 or D60 as appropriate.

 

D36.C13c

Total non-residential

Externally-provided Project management costs for the total non-residential estate.

 

D36.C14c

Residential

Externally-provided Project management costs for the residential estate.

 

D36.C01c

Total HEI

Externally-provided Project management costs for the total HEI. Sum total of Externally-provided Project management costs for the total non-residential estate and Externally-provided Project management costs for the residential estate.

 

D36.C13

Total non-residential

Externally-provided Property management costs for the total non-residential estate. Sum total of Externally-provided Estate management costs for the total non-residential estate, Externally-provided Facilities management costs for the residential estate and Externally-provided Project management costs for the total non-residential estate.

 

D36.C14

Residential

Externally-provided Property management costs for the residential estate. Sum total of Externally-provided Estate management costs for the residential estate, Externally-provided Facilities management costs for the residential estate and Externally-provided Project management costs for the residential estate.

 

D36.C01

Total HEI

Externally-provided Property management costs for the total HEI. Sum total of Externally-provided Estate management costs for the total HEI, Externally-provided Facilities management costs for the total HEI and Externally-provided Project management costs for the total HEI.

 

D37 Property management staffing

Full-time equivalent (FTE) staff associated with all property management activities. Staff should be split into three categories:

D37a Property management staffing - Estate management staff

D37b Property management staffing - Facilities management staff

D37c Property management staffing - Project management staff

Include all HEI staff carrying out work of this kind, whether they belong to the estates department or not. Include all staff either doing this work directly or supporting these activities.

Exclude any staff not employed directly by the HEI.

 

D37a Property management staffing - Estate management staff

Full-time equivalent staff associated with estates strategy and planning, all landlord and tenant matters, acquisitions and sales of properties, rating, buildings insurance, and the general high level management (not direct supervision) of energy, water and sewerage, cleaning, repair and maintenance. Where staff are allocated part-time to estates management (as defined), allocate on a pro rata basis.

Include all HEI staff on a basis carrying out work of this kind, whether they belong to the estates department or not. Include all staff either doing this work directly or supporting these activities;

Exlude:

  • the staff required to plan for and justify capital and revenue projects (including capital bids) and the staff designing or project managing the works themselves
  • The staff working in other facilities management and associated support services (e.g. residences, security, porterage, and communications), even if these staff are employed within the estates department
  • Exclude any contracted-out staff working in an estates capacity.

Where staff are allocated part-time to property management (as defined), allocate on a pro rata basis.

D37.C01a

Total HEI

Estate management staff for the whole estate.

D37b Property management staffing - Facilities management staff

This category should include all staff associated with activities that support the occupancy of the estate. This will include staff associated with the management and administration (not supervision) of cleaning, security and porterage, reception services, post room and internal distribution services, and transport (refer to D60 for further details on the definition of the above activities). Where staff are allocated part-time to facilities management (as defined), allocate on a pro rata basis.

D37.C01b

Total HEI

Facilities management staff for the whole estate.

D37c Property management staffing - Project management staff

This category should include all staff required to plan for and justify capital and revenue projects (including capital bids) and the designing and/or project managing of the work. Where staff are allocated part-time to project management (as defined), allocate on a pro rata basis.

D37.C01c

Total HEI

Project management staff for the whole estate.

D37.C01

Total HEI

Property management staffing for the total estate. Sum total of Estate management staff, Facilities management staff and Project management staff.

D38a Energy consumption

Energy consumption, defined in kilowatt-hours (kWh), including gas, liquefied petroleum gas, oil and electricity.

A breakdown consistent with the six costs categories used in D31 Energy costs should be provided as well as a total figure for a full year's consumption as at the end of the acadmic year.

  • Oil
  • Gas
  • Electricity
  • Coal
  • Steam/hot water
  • Other fuels (including district heating, liquefied petroleum gas, solar power etc.)

Note that the breakdown of energy consumption by fuel type should only be provided for the whole estate, and is not required split into non-residential and residential.

The following factors are the basis for converting oil and natural gas figures to kWh:

  • Litres of oil x 10.6 = kWh equivalent
  • Therms of Natural Gas x 29.31 = kWh equivalent

There are difficulties with the measurement of consumption under certain circumstances, some of which are considered below.

Electricity: Tariffs based on 'maximum demand' consumption may not provide actual kWh consumption. This figure should be requested from the local electricity board.

Gas meters: Readings should be made to the nearest 100 cubic feet. Annual consumption figures should be modified pro rata if readings are not exactly one year apart. However, the readings must not be more than thirteen months apart or less than eleven months apart.

Oil metering: In cases where no oil meters are installed, the amount of oil consumed within a period will be logged using dip rods. For example:

  • Dip rod reading on last day of January: 1,050 litres
  • Delivery of oil on second week in February: 3,000 litres
  • Dip rod reading on last day of February: 2,500 litres
  • Amount used in February: (1,050 + 3,000) less 2,500 = 1,550 litres.

District heating: Systems which distribute steam or hot water to multiple buildings. District heating can be provided from a variety of sources. All sources of district heating purchased should be included under this category. This includes third parties external to the HEI who generate power away from the site (such as a local authority or using waste heat from external industrial processes), as well as HEI-owned third parties used to supply combined heating and power (CHP) energy. It will be important to ensure that there is no double-counting in the energy consumption of other fuels, such as gas. The distinction between energy consumption from combined heating and power will be important in relation to the energy emissions figure to be returned under D38c.

Where an HEI uses CHP, in order to avoid double-counting in terms of notional CO2 emissions and Energy Consumption, consumption and emissions should be accounted for as follows:

Inputs (generally gas, but sometimes other types of solid or fossil fuels) should be included in the notional CO2 emissions but excluded from the energy consumption totals.

Outputs (heat kWh and power kWh) should be excluded from the CO2 emissions total but included in the energy consumption total.

To convert figures into kWh

  • Multiply megawatt hours by 1,000
  • Multiply gigajoule hours by 278
  • Multiply tons of steam by 698
  • Multiply Gcal by 1,163.

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG): Include figures for any LPG gas purchased and used directly by the HEI for cooking or heating purposes. Also include any LPG gas purchased for scientific laboratories. Exclude any LPG used by contract, cost or profit catering centres operated by external contractors.

LPG consumption should be provided by bills for refilling containers or providing new containers. Assume that all LPG provided and paid for has been consumed. Therefore, take billing figures over a full calendar year.

To convert figures into kWh

  • Multiply litres by 7.0
  • Multiply kg by 13.9

Where energy consumed is not metered or measured it should not be counted.

Fuel used in vehicles owned or leased by the HEI

Provide consumption figures (in litres) of fuel used in all vehicles owned or leased by the HEI.  This is likely to relate to vehicles used, for example, by HEI facilities management services, a university bus service or a HEI vehicle provided to the vice-chancellor or principal. Vehicles should be interpreted in the widest sense and include for example tractors, ride on lawn-mowers, ships, planes and racing cars.

This should not include fuel used in hire cars, hired buses or private vehicles even if the cost is re-claimed from the HEI; nor fuel used for commuting or student travel in private vehicles.

D38a.C01a

Total HEI

Energy consumption for the total estate - Oil.

D38a.C01b

Total HEI

Energy consumption for the total estate - Gas.

D38a.C01c

Total HEI

Energy consumption for the total estate - Electricity.

D38a.C01d

Total HEI

Energy consumption for the total estate - Coal.

D38a.C01e

Total HEI

Energy consumption for the total estate - Steam/hot water.

D38a.C01f

Total HEI

Energy consumption for the total estate - Other fuels.

D38a.C13

Total non-residential

Energy consumption for the total non-residential estate.

D38a.C14

Residential

Energy consumption for the total residential estate.

D38a.C01

Total HEI

Energy consumption for the total estate. Sum total of Energy consumption for the total estate oil, gas, electricity, coal, steam/hot water and other fuels.

D38a.C01g

Total HEI

Energy consumption for the total estate - Fuel used in vehicles owned or leased by the HEI.

A figure (litres) should be provided for this fuel type but it is not included in the C01 total along with the other six fuel types. This data is required for reporting as part of the Carbon Reduction Commitment, but the data do not directly relate to the estate.

D38b Water consumption

The volume, measured in m3, of metered fresh water consumed. Where possible, data should be sub-divided to reflect the residential and non-residential estate. It is recognised that institutions in Scotland will not be able to sub-divide residential and non-residential estate. Where this subdivision is not available, the total HEI value should be provided. The consumption for the whole estate should equal the sum for the residential and non-residential parts of the estate.

Water metering and billing arrangements vary significantly throughout the UK. Some HEIs do not pay for water consumption by volume, especially for residential use. These HEIs may not be able to provide data on this issue. Others pay a combination of rateable value and metered water consumption.

Those HEIs that can provide data should use the following data sources:

  • Water bills
  • Meter readings from all mains water meters.

Include water consumption for arable land.

D38b.C13

Total non-residential

Water consumption for the total non-residential estate.

Y

D38b.C14

Residential

Water consumption for the residential estate.

Y

D38b.C01

Total HEI

Water consumption for the total estate. Sum total of water consumption for the total non-residential and residential estates.

Y

D38c Energy emissions

The energy consumption figures returned under D38a should be converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalents. The following conversion rates should be used, unless a more appropriate conversion rate is available to an HEI.

These Fuel conversion factors are taken from the DEFRA and were updated in October 2010. A full list of carbon conversion factors and guidelines for use is found at:

http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/business/reporting/conversion-factors.htm

Electricity supplied through 'green tariffs' should not be considered zero carbon, but the average grid electricity carbon factor should be applied. In exceptional circumstances where an HEI can demonstrate that the renewable electricity is additional to a utility's statutory requirement for renewable energy generation (i.e. where the Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROCs) have been retained) this amount of electricity can be zero carbon rated.

If combined heat and power (CHP) is used and all the outputs are used for HEI needs, then the above conversion rates can be used based upon fuel used.

In order to avoid double-counting in terms of notional CO2 emissions and energy consumption, consumption and emissions should be accounted for as follows:

  • Inputs (generally gas, but sometimes other types of solid or fossil fuels) should be included in the notional CO2 emissions but excluded from the energy consumption totals
  • Outputs (heat kWh and power kWh) should be excluded from the CO2 emissions total but included in the energy consumption total.

A total kg CO2 figure should be returned for the HEI for each of the above fuel type categories for the whole estate only. In addition, a total kg CO2 figure should be returned for the total non-residential estate, the residential estate and the whole estate.

Fuel used in vehicles owned or leased by the HEI

The energy consumption figures returned under vehicle emissions should be converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalents. The conversion rates above should be used, unless a more appropriate conversion rate is available to an HEI.

D38c.C01a

Total HEI

Energy emissions for the total estate - Oil.

D38c.C01b

Total HEI

Energy emissions for the total estate - Gas.

D38c.C01c

Total HEI

Energy emissions for the total estate - Electricity.

D38c.C01d

Total HEI

Energy emissions for the total estate - Coal.

D38c.C01e

Total HEI

Energy emissions for the total estate - Steam/hot water.

D38c.C01f

Total HEI

Energy emissions for the total estate - Other fuels.

D38c.C13

Total non-residential

Energy emissions for the total non-residential estate.

Y

D38c.C14

Residential

Energy emissions for the total residential estate.

Y

D38c.C01

Total HEI

Energy emissions for the whole estate. Sum total of Energy emissions for the total non-residential estate and energy emissions for the residential estate.

Y

D38c.C01g

Total HEI

Energy emissions for the total estate - Fuel used in vehicles owned or leased by the HEI.

A figure (CO2) should be provided for this fuel type but it is not included in the C01 total along with the other six fuel types. This data is required for reporting as part of the Carbon Reduction Commitment, but the data do not directly relate to the estate.

D39a Current cost of legislative compliance

The proportion of current maintenance expenditure (see D33) that is attributable to ensuring legislative compliance.

This will relate to legislation and regulations such as the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, Construction (Design & Management Regulations) 1994, Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations (As Amended), 1998, Fire Precautions (Workplace) (Amendment) Regulations 1999 and the Disability Discrimination Act 2005. This is not an exhaustive list of relevant legislation or regulations.

The actions will include, but are not limited to, pressure vessel testing, lift maintenance, reasonable adjustments required to meet the needs of disabled users, testing of fire fighting equipment, personal appliance testing, monitoring asbestos and other health hazards, maintaining health and safety files, preparing fire risk assessments, substance and article maintenance and other plant and system operations. Note that coverage relates only to activities that are covered by maintenance expenditure as defined in D33.

The emphasis of this definition is to identify the proportion of existing maintenance expenditure that is primarily associated with ensuring that the estate is compliant. This will provide a measure of the amount of discretionary expenditure, over and above the commitment to legislative compliance, which is available to maintain the estate.

D39a.C13

Total non-residential

Current cost of legislative compliance total figure for non-residential estate. A percentage should be returned to one decimal place.

D39a.C14

Residential

Current cost of legislative compliance total figure for residential estate. A percentage should be returned to one decimal place.

D39a.C01

Total HEI

Current cost of legislative compliance total figure for the whole estate. A percentage should be returned to one decimal place.

D41 Method of space apportionment

There are various methods of calculating space allocation. Specify which of the approaches set out below is closest to the one the institution has used (see D12). If possible it would be preferable if the time use basis was used.

  • Allocation on the basis of the time use (T) of individual rooms
  • Allocation on the basis of the predominant use (P) of individual rooms.

D41.C01

Total HEI

Enter T if space allocation is calculated on the basis of the time use of individual rooms or enter P is space allocation as calculated on the basis of the predominant use of individual rooms.

D42 Method of costs apportionment

There are various methods of calculating costs. Specify which of the approaches set out below is closest to the one used:

  • Working from building-specific (B) data and combining this with space use information. This should approximate to the most accurate data possible
  • Working from site-specific (S) data and combining this with space use information. This will be more accurate than E but less accurate than B
  • Taking the total costs for the whole estate (E), allocating an overall cost per m2.

D42.C01

Total HEI

Enter B if costs apportionment is calculated working from building-specific data, enter S if calculated working from site-specific data or enter E if costs apportionment is calculated taking the costs for the whole estate.

D43 Space charging system

Indicate if the HEI used a method of space charging in such a way that the costs of space allocation are charged to each department, faculty etc. and reflected in the management accounts.

D43.C13

Total non-residential

Enter Yes or No.

D44 Central timetabling

The percentage of all net internal area used for teaching (as recorded under heading D12/C03) which is timetabled centrally.

D44.C03

Teaching other

Figure for other teaching space.

D45 Frequency rate calculation

Identify whether the frequency rate figures quoted are based on:

  • Timetabled use (T) (the proportion of the total relevant time period for which space is booked), or using;
  • A survey-based measure (S) based on a standard week in the year. The preference is for a survey based return if available.

D45.C03

Teaching other

Enter T if the frequency rate figures quoted are based on timetabled use or enter S if the frequency rate figures quoted are based on a survey-based measure.

D46 Occupancy rate calculation

Identify whether the occupancy rate figures quoted are based on:

  • The theoretical size of the group using the room at the beginning of the year (Group Size). Enter G; or
  • A Survey of the actual numbers in teaching rooms. The preference is for a survey based return if available. Enter S.

D46.C03

Teaching other

Enter G if the occupancy rate figures quoted are based on group size or enter S if the occupancy rate figures quoted are based on a survey.

D47 Assessment of building condition

Indicate the basis on which the HEI allocated the assessment of building condition completed for D20a.

Assessment of building condition may either be on the basis of a building level assessment (B) or at a finer level on a proportionate split basis (P).

D47.C01

Total HEI

Enter B if the assessment of building condition is on the basis of a building level assessment or enter P if the assessment of building condition is on a proportionate split basis.

D60 Total facilities costs

No figure needs to be entered for D60 (C13, C14 and C01) - total facilities costs will be calculated automatically after an entry has been made within the data items listed below.

The total net revenue costs of activities that support the occupying of space. Total facilities costs are required for the categories set out in below (1-5).

The following costs will be added together automatically to derive total facilities costs:

  1. Cleaning costs - D34
  2. Security and porterage costs - D61
  3. Central post room and internal distribution service costs - D62
  4. Internally-incurred Facilities management costs - D35b. This figure will be automatically taken from D35b and does not need to be re-entered here.
  5. Externally-provided Facilities management costs - D36b. This figure will be automatically taken from D36b and does not need to be re-entered here.

D60.C13

Total non-residential

Figure for the total non-residential estate.

D60.C14

Residential

Figure for the residential estate.

D60.C01

Total HEI

Figure for the whole estate. Sum total of the non-residential and residential estate figures.

D61 Security and porterage costs

The annual net revenue cost of securing the premises and porterage duties.

Security incorporates the costs of security contractors and employed staff as well as the regular costs associated with the maintenance of systems (usually in the form of a maintenance contract). Maintenance costs of intruder detection systems such as alarms, detectors, central control and CCTV should be included. Include access control systems, badges/identity cards, access control readers, access control passes, access gates/huts, vehicular access control, uniforms, communication equipment, Tannoys, loudspeakers, special lighting (both temporary and permanent), security fences and temporary barriers and road blocks. (Costs may need to be re-assigned or apportioned between this definition and the Maintenance (D33) definition).

Exclude complete or partial renewal of systems due to disrepair. Any expenditure incurred as a result of a security breach should be recorded against the relevant category (e.g. Maintenance definition D33).

D61.C13

Total non-residential

Total figure for the non-residential estate.

D61.C14

Residential

Total figure for the residential estate.

D61.C01

Total HEI

Total figure for the whole estate. Sum total of the non-residential and residential estate figures.

D62 Central post room and internal distribution services costs

The total net revenue cost of all post room and messenger staff. Activities to include opening, collating, distributing, collecting, packaging, stamping, recording and despatching mail.

Exclude the costs of stamps and similar mailing costs as well as all couriers and special delivery costs.

D62.C13

Total non-residential

Total figure for the non-residential estate.

D62.C14

Residential

Total figure for the residential estate.

D62.C01

Total HEI

Total figure for the whole estate. Sum total of the non-residential and residential estate figures.

D70 Listed building coverage

The total gross internal area that is identified as being on the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest or a Scheduled Ancient Monument. Listing or categorising is as defined by the following key sources: Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990; Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997, Northern Ireland Planning Order 1991.

The data should include buildings in the following categories, but no separate return for each of the categories should be made. Instead, a single figure for all listed buildings should be returned, split between residential and non-residential:

  • Of exceptional interest: Grade I (England and Wales), Grade A (Northern Ireland), Grade A (Scotland)
  • Of particular importance and perhaps containing outstanding features: Grade II* (England and Wales), Grade B+ (Northern Ireland), Grade B (Scotland)
  • Of special interest which warrants every effort being made to preserve them: Grade II (England and Wales), (Grade B1) Northern Ireland, Grade C (Scotland).

The assessment should only relate to currently listed properties, rather than those which may be in the process of being listed. The properties should also only be those covered by the appropriate legislation, as indicated above, rather than by schemes such as local authority designated lists of historical buildings or equivalent.

The return should only include the floor area directly associated with the listing. For a listed building frontage, the whole of the building floor area associated with the listed frontage should be returned, rather than just the area of the frontage area itself.

D70.C13

Total non-residential

Figure for the non-residential estate.

D70.C14

Residential

Figure for the residential estate.

D70.C01

Total HEI

Figure for the whole estate. Sum total of the non-residential and residential estate figures.

D71 Number of car parking spaces

 

The total number of car parking spaces that are operated by the HEI for HEI activities. This should include parking spaces leased from outside bodies and which are used by the HEI for normal operational activities, such as staff, student or visitor parking. Exclude any parking spaces owned or leased by the HEI, but which are used exclusively or predominantly by non-HEI sources.

If car park areas are set aside for parking but do not have designated parking bays, an assessment of the number of operationally effective spaces should be made and returned. This should include unadopted highway that is within the campus or part of the HEI, and which is normally used for HEI-related parking.

Areas that are being used temporarily for car parking purposes should be ignored if the period of use is less than one month in total over the year in question.

If car parking areas are used for both residential and non-residential purposes, then an apportionment between these activities will need to be made.

D71.C13

Total non-residential

Figure for the non-residential estate.

D71.C14

Residential

Figure for the residential estate.

D71.C01

Total HEI

Figure for the whole estate. Sum total of the non-residential and residential estate figures.

D72a Use of renewable energy sources

 

This should indicate if renewable energy sources are used to provide a significant volume of annual consumption.

Renewable energy is constituted by those sources having a zero carbon loading such as sunshine, wind, flowing water, biological processes, and geothermal heat flows. For the purposes of this definition and as a high level indicator, it is suggested that 15% constitutes a significant contribution from renewable sources.

D72a.C01 Total HEI Enter Yes if renewable energy sources are used to provide a significant volume of annual consumption. Enter No if not.

D72c Energy generated on site by CHP

 

Provide the annual energy (kWh equivalent) generated on-site from combined heat and power (CHP).  Include both heat and electricity.

CHP is a means by which heat and electricity are generated locally, using gas but sometimes using other forms of fuel. It is an alternative to using grid electricity and other fuels for heating and is generally, but not always, a greener alternative.

Electricity from on-site CHP should be monitored but not included in the HEI's carbon baseline; only inputs (as kWh, therm or m3) should be counted. This avoids double-counting of gas and electricity use.

Where an HEI uses CHP, in order to avoid double-counting in terms of notional CO2 emissions and energy consumption, consumption and emissions should be accounted for as follows:

  • Inputs (generally gas, but sometimes other types of solid or fossil fuels) should be included in the notional CO2 emissions but excluded from the energy consumption total
  • Outputs (heat kWh & power kWh) should be excluded from the CO2 emissions total but included in the energy consumption total.
D72c.C01 Total HEI Figure for the total estate.

D72d Renewable energy generated on or off site, either by the HEI independently or in partnership with others

 

The annual energy (kWh equivalent) generated through renewable energy sources. Typically this may include energy derived from:

  • Biomass-fuelled boilers
  • Solar electric panels (photovoltaics)
  • Solar thermal panels (solar water heating)
  • Wind turbines
  • Ground source heat pumps
  • Other.

All energy generated does not need to be consumed by the individual HEI as some energy may be sold to third parties, such as the National Grid.

The relevant energy need not be produced on freehold land and therefore may be produced on land that is leased or held on licence.

Where energy generated is not metered or measured it should not be counted.

Electricity supplied through 'green tariffs' should not be included except in exceptional circumstances where an HEI can demonstrate that the renewable electricity is additional to a utility's statutory requirement for renewable energy generation (i.e. where the Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROCs) have been retained).

D72d.C01 Total HEI Figure for the total estate.

D72e Use of renewable energy sources - % total energy from renewable energy sources generated on or off site, either by the HEI independently or in partnership with others

 

Provide the approximate percentage contribution to annual energy consumption (D38a(C01)) from renewable sources. This contribution should exclude green tariffs.

Figures are required for:

  • % contribution where ROCs are retained or not claimed by the HEI
  • % contribution where the ROCs are sold by the HEI.

For further information refer to http://www.carbontrust.co.uk/climatechange/policy/renewables_obligation.htm

D72e.C01a Total HEI % contribution where ROCs are retained or not claimed by the HEI for the total estate.
D72e.C01b Total HEI % contribution where the ROCS are sold by the HEI for the total estate.

D72f Carbon conversion factor for D72e

 

Provide an appropriate carbon conversion factor for any renewable energy under D72e.

This information should be available from the HEI's energy supplier or advice can be obtained from the carbon trust website at http://http://www.carbontrust.co.uk

Where more than one conversion factor applies, a weighted average should be provided based on kWh.

D72f.C01 Total HEI Figure for the total estate.

D73 Waste mass

 

The approximate annual mass of waste arriving as a result of the estate activities. HEIs, contracts and suppliers of management services should be able to provide mass equivalents.

To convert from volume data to mass equivalent, we suggest the following guide and high level factors:

Conversions

  • Volume (in m3) x Factor = Mass (tonnes)
  • Volume (litres)/1000 x Factor = Mass (tonnes)
  • Volume (cubic feet) x 0.028 x Factor = Mass (tonnes).

Units should be tonnes (1000kg) waste.

Factors

The follwing documents will assist HEIs in converting volume data to mass equivalents:

EMS seeks to capture all waste arising at HEI level, to include construction waste and also capture waste at a more granular level.

The disposal methods categories remain the same for D73, however these will need to be split for the non-residential and residential elements of the estate as well as 'works of construction, demolition and excavation' to sum to a total waste mass figure:

Recycled - the annual mass of waste, in tonnes, sent for recycling.

Incineration - the annual mass of incinerated waste, in tonnes.

Other - other methods of disposal offsite. This should include the mass of waste disposed through alternative methods to recycling or incineration.

Used to create energy - The annual mass of waste (in tonnes) that is used to create energy e.g. used for Biomass boilers or CHP. Exclude waste that is incinerated with no energy recovery.

The sum total of the data items below should add up to D73 Waste Mass C01 Total.

Exclude from waste mass total slurry/compost which is kept on-site and any other reuse of materials such as using excavated materials for landscaping. 'Pay by weight' or survey based estimates can be used to improve the accuracy of data.

D73.C13a

Total non-residential

Total non-residential waste mass - Recycled.

D73.C13b

Total non-residential

Total non-residential waste mass - Incineration.

D73.C13c

Total non-residential

Total non-residential waste mass - Other methods.

D73.C13d

Total non-residential

Total non-residential waste mass - Used to create energy.

D73.C13

Total non-residential

Total non-residential waste mass. Sum total of non-residential waste mass recycled, incineration, other methods and used to create energy.

D73.C14a

Residential

Total residential waste mass - Recycled.

D73.C14b

Residential

Total residential waste mass - Incineration.

D73.C14c

Residential

Total residential waste mass - Other methods.

D73.C14d

Residential

Total residential waste mass - Used to create energy.

D73.C14

Residential

Total residential waste mass. Sum total of residential waste mass recycled, incineration, other methods and used to create energy.

D73.C15a

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere - Recycled.

D73.C15b

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere - Incineration.

D73.C15c

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere - Other methods.

D73.C15d

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere - Used to create energy.

D73.C15

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere

All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere. Sum total of recycled, incineration, other methods and used to create energy.

D73.C01a

Total HEI

Total waste mass for the whole estate - recycled. Sum total of Total non-residential waste mass - recycled, Total residential waste mass - recycled and All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere - Recycled.

Y

D73.C01b

Total HEI

Total waste mass for the whole estate - incineration. Sum total of Total non-residential waste mass - incineration, Total residential waste mass - incineration and All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere - Incineration.

Y

D73.C01c

Total HEI

Total waste mass for the whole estate - other methods. Sum total of Total non-residential waste mass - other methods, Total residential waste mass - other methods and All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere - Other methods.

Y

D73.C01d

Total HEI

Total waste mass for the whole estate - used to create energy. Sum total of Total non-residential waste mass - used to create energy, Total residential waste mass - used to create energy and All works of construction, demolition and excavation not captured elsewhere - Used to create energy.

Y

D73.C01

Total HEI

Total figure for the whole estate.

Y

D74a Travel plan on web

 

Does the HEI have an HEI travel plan which is publicly available on the web site?

A travel plan can be defined as a 'Strategy for managing access to a site or development by a range of modes of transport, focusing on promoting access by sustainable modes'.

D74a.C01

Total HEI

Answer Yes or No.

D74b Environmental policy on web

 

Does the HEI have an environmental/sustainability/CSR policy which is publicly available on the web?

D74b.C01

Total HEI

Answer Yes or No.

D74c Biodiversity policy on web

 

Does the HEI have a Biodiversity policy which is publicly available on the web? This need not be a separate document and could be incorporated within a Corporate Social Responsibility or Environmental Policy.

D74c.C01

Total HEI

Answer Yes or No.

D74d Environmental auditing

 

Does the HEI have an environmental management system such as ISO14001, EMAS, Ecocampus (gold or platinum award)?

D74d.C01

Total HEI

Answer Yes or No.

D74e Environmental reporting

 

Does the HEI report publicly on the web site on its environmental performance?

This may be through Business in the Community, the Global Reporting initiative or against formally agreed and publicly available targets.

D74e.C01

Total HEI

Answer Yes or No.

D74f Fair trade accreditation

 

Does the HEI have Fair trade status?

Must relate to entire HEI i.e. including the Student Union. Partial accreditations such as for catering should not count.

Details on Fair trade accreditation can be found at: http://www.fairtrade.org.uk/what_is_fairtrade/fairtrade_certification_and_the_fairtrade_mark/default.aspx

D74f.C01

Total HEI

Answer Yes or No.

D75 % Single occupancy car journeys

 

Estimated percentage of staff/students who travel to work in single occupancy car journeys as their primary mode of travel. The figures provided are not a percentage of the total numbers travelling to their place of work or study by car, but a percentage of the total number of staff/students (or a representative sample of the total), accounting for all modes of transport.

Although preferable, it is not anticipated that the relevant staff/student surveys will be carried out on an annual basis for all HEIs and therefore the results may hold over from one year to the next between surveys.

D75a Staff single occupancy

D75.C01a

Total HEI

% Staff single occupancy car journeys.

D75b Students single occupancy

D75.C01b

Total HEI

% Students single occupancy car journeys.

D75.C01

Total HEI

% Single occupancy car journeys for the whole estate.

D76 Number of cycle spaces

 

Number of designated cycle spaces (capacity) where a bicycle can be locked up. These do not necessarily need to be under cover.

Includes cycle spaces on both residential and non-residential sites.

D76.C01

Total HEI

Total number of cycle spaces for the whole estate.

D77a Water supply 'grey water' and rain water

 

The annual volume (m3) of non-mains water supply for potable and non-potable use by the HEI from rainwater and 'grey water'.

Grey water is defined as the waste water produced from baths and showers, clothes washers, and lavatories. This can be recycled and reused if an appropriate system is installed. Rainwater recycling can also be installed to use the water which falls on the building in other systems such as watering the grounds or flushing toilets.

Includes rainwater and 'grey water' capture for arable land, where this water is included in the consumption figure under D38b.

Excludes mains supplied water.

D77a.C01

Total HEI

Total water supply 'grey water' and rain water for the whole estate.

D77b Water supply borehole extraction

 

The annual volume (m3) of non-mains water supply for potable and non-potable use by HEI from borehole extraction.

Borehole volume should be reported as the volume taken, not the licensed volume.

Excludes mains supplied water.

D77b.C01

Total HEI

Total water supply borehole extraction for the whole estate.

D78 Non-residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) category

 

Under D78a-g provide the total GIA (Gross Internal Area) in m2 of non-residential buildings that fall under each Display Energy Certificate (DEC) / (EPC - Scotland only) rating category.

For further information refer to http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/planningandbuilding/displayenergycertificates.

Figures should be assembled as follows:

a) Non-residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category A.

b) Non-residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category B.

c) Non-residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category C.

d) Non-residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category D.

e) Non-residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category E.

f) Non-residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category F.

g) Non-residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category G.

D78a

D78a.C13

Total non-residential

Sum of non-residential GIA (D11 (C13)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category A.

D78b

D78b.C13

Total non-residential

Sum of non-residential GIA (D11 (C13)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category B.

D78c

D78c.C13

Total non-residential

Sum of non-residential GIA (D11 (C13)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category C.

D78d

D78d.C13

Total non-residential

Sum of non-residential GIA (D11 (C13)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category D.

D78e

D78e.C13

Total non-residential

Sum of non-residential GIA (D11 (C13)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category E.

D78f

D78f.C13

Total non-residential

Sum of non-residential GIA (D11 (C13)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category F.

D78g

D78g.C13

Total non-residential

Sum of non-residential GIA (D11 (C13)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category G.

D79 Residential GIA in DEC category

 

Under D79a-g provide the total GIA (Gross Internal Area) in m2 of residential buildings that fall under each Display Energy Certificate (DEC) / (EPC - Scotland only) rating category.

For further information refer to http://www.communities.gov.uk/publications/planningandbuilding/displayenergycertificates.

Figures should be assembled as follows:

a) Residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category A.

b) Residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category B.

c) Residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category C.

d) Residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category D.

e) Residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category E.

f) Residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category F.

g) Residential GIA in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category G.

D79a

D79a.C14

Residential

Sum of residential GIA (D11(C14)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category A.

D79b

D79b.C14

Residential

Sum of residential GIA (D11(C14)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category B.

D79c

D79c.C14

Residential

Sum of residential GIA (D11(C14)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category C.

D79d

D79d.C14

Residential

Sum of residential GIA (D11(C14)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category D.

D79e

D79e.C14

Residential

Sum of residential GIA (D11(C14)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category E.

D79f

D79f.C14

Residential

Sum of residential GIA (D11(C14)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category F.

D79g

D79g.C14

Residential

Sum of residential GIA (D11(C14)) in DEC / (EPC - Scotland only) Category G.

D80 EU Emissions Trading Scheme

 

Information about the EU Emissions Trading Scheme can be found at:

http://ec.europa.eu/environment/climat/pdf/emission_trading2_en.pdf.

D80a Participation in EU Emissions Trading Scheme

D80a.C01

Total HEI

If the answer to D80a is 'Yes' answer D80c and D80d.

If the institution participates in the EU Emissions Trading Scheme answer Yes. If the institution does not participate in this Scheme answer No.

D80b: Participation in the Carbon Reduction Commitment

D80b.C01

Total HEI

If the institution participates in the Carbon Reduction Commitment answer Yes. If the institution does not participate answer No.

Further information can be found at http://www.carbontrust.co.uk.

D80c Carbon allowance in specified phase (tonnes of CO2)

D80c.C01

Total HEI

Phase 2 commenced on 1 January 2008 and will end on 31 December 2012

D80d: Allowances bought or sold in specified phase (tonnes of CO2)

D80d.C01

Total HEI

Figure for the total estate.