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Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education in the United Kingdom for the academic year 2015/16

Statistical First Release SFR245

This Statistical First Release includes: Summary | Introduction | Key points | Regional breakdown | Tables | Notes and FAQs | Definitions | View a printable version of this SFR

Summary

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This Statistical First Release (SFR) provides details of the destinations of leavers from higher education for the academic year 2015/16.

 

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Destinations of UK and other EU domiciled leavers by academic year 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

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SFR245: Chart 1 - Destinations of UK and other EU domiciled leavers 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

  • In 2015/16, the percentage of leavers in further study was 15%, this is the highest point it has been at in the five years from 2011/12 to 2015/16.
  • In 2015/16, the percentage of leavers in unemployment was 5%, this has been gradually decreasing since 2011/12 where it stood at 7%.
  • The percentage of leavers in UK work increased to a five year peak of 68% in 2013/14 and 2014/15. It then declined one percentage point in 2015/16, as the percentage in further study rose.
 

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Median salaries of UK domiciled full-time leavers who obtained first degree qualifications and entered full-time paid work in the UK 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

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SFR245: Chart 2 - Median salaries of UK domiciled full-time leavers who obtained first degree qualifications and<br />
entered full-time paid work in the UK 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

  • In 2011/12, among both professional and non-professional job roles, there was a £1,000 pay gap in the median salary between UK domiciled full-time male and female leavers who obtained first degree qualifications and entered full-time paid work in the UK.
  • Over the last five years, the pay gap in median salary has remained relatively stable for leavers in professional job roles.
  • From 2012/13 onwards, for those in non-professional job roles, the pay gap in median salary became negligable.

Introduction

As in previous years, this SFR focuses on all publicly funded UK HE providers and the University of Buckingham. Experimental statistics on the destinations of leavers from alternative providers will be reported on in a separate release in July 2017.

The coverage of the Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey consists of all UK, European Union and non-EU domiciled leavers for whom destinations data is expected and sought (see Definitions) from UK HE providers in 2015/16. The target population in 2015/16 was 670,780 (compared to 668,865 in 2014/15). For this SFR, as in previous years, non-EU leavers and leavers who obtained postgraduate research qualifications from dormant status are excluded.

In 2015/16, there were 412,300 UK and other EU leavers who responded from the target population of 529,445, an overall response rate of 78% (UK 79%, EU 60%). This response rate is lower than the response rate of 79% in 2014/15. Response rates by level of qualification and domicile are included in this SFR in Table 1 . For more information on the coverage of the DLHE survey please refer to the Definitions.

Readers should be aware that data definitions sometimes change over time and this can affect the validity of time series comparisons. Any significant changes have been explained in the Definitions.

Key points (All UK HE providers)

  • In 2015/16, the percentage of leavers in work was lower than in 2014/15, but the percentage of leavers in further study was higher, see Chart 8. This coincides with the introduction of postgraduate loans for students domiciled in England in 2016/17. Leavers domiciled from England contributed to increases in the percentage in further study across HE providers in England and Wales. There was also an increase in the percentage of leavers in further study from HE providers in Scotland, but this was due to increases in those domiciled from Scotland.
  • In 2015/16, 5% of leavers were unemployed (5% of full-time and 3% of part-time leavers), see Table 1 and Chart 3. The overall proportion and the proportion of part-time leavers has remained unchanged from 2014/15 but the proportion of full-time leavers has reduced from 6% in 2014/15.
  • In 2015/16, 6% of all male leavers were unemployed compared to 2014/15 where it was 7%. This is compared to 4% of all females which has remained unchanged since 2014/15, see Table 2.
 

      

 
 

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Destinations of UK and other EU domiciled leavers 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

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SFR245: Chart 3 - Destinations of UK and other EU domiciled leavers 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

Level and mode of study   

In 2015/16, 68% of full-time first degree leavers were in employment and were not also studying. This is compared to 2014/15 where that figures was 70%. Of all full-time leavers, there was a larger increase in the percentage in further study in 2015/16 compared with 2014/15 than there was among all part-time leavers.

In 2015/16, of part-time first degree leavers, 73% were in employment and were not also studying. This is a reduction on 2014/15, but no difference was seen in the percentage unemployed between 2014/15 and 2015/16, see Table 5a and Chart 3.

Chart 3 shows there is a considerable difference in the destinations of full-time leavers depending on the qualification levels and mode they had achieved. In 2015/16, 80% of full-time other postgraduate leavers with a known destination were in UK or overseas employment, compared to 68% of full-time first degree leavers. Correspondingly, 9% of full-time other postgraduate UK and other EU leavers with a known destination were in further study, compared to 17% of full-time first degree leavers.

Salary

Chart 4 shows that of UK domiciled leavers in full-time UK paid work, a higher proportion of males than females have salaries of £25,000 or more. The difference between the salaries of males and females is also reflected in the mean and median values. In 2015/16, the median salary for female leavers was £21,000 compared to £22,000 for males, and this difference is shown further by the mean salary, £21,500 for females compared to £24,000 for males. These averages were the same as in 2014/15, although the mean salary for females has increased from £21,000, see Table 9. Longitudinal Education Outcomes (LEO) statistics published by the Department for Education also show the existence of a gender pay gap among graduates, even at early stages of their careers.

Salaries also varied by subject of study and are shown in Table 10 in this SFR split by sex for full-time first degree leavers in full-time paid employment in the UK in 2015/16. The largest median salaries were reported by leavers who studied Medicine & dentistry (£30,000), Veterinary science (£28,000) and Engineering & technology (£25,500). Responses to the salary question also varied by subject area, with 81% of Mathematical sciences leavers declaring their salary compared to 61% for Medicine & dentistry.

 

      

 
 

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Percentage of UK domiciled leavers in full-time paid work in the UK by salary band and sex 2015/16

 

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SFR245: Chart 4 - Percentage of UK domiciled leavers in full-time paid work in the UK by salary band and sex 2015/16

 

Chart 5 presents information on the movement of UK students from home to study and onto employment. It shows the number of leavers domiciled from a specified region, from an HE provider in that specified region, or employed in that region, and the flow of movements between that region and the rest of the UK. Table A providers further detail on Chart 5, showing the specific regions that leavers move between.

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Chart 5 - UK domiciled higher education leavers in work in the UK by region of domicile, region of HE provider and region of employment 2015/16

Region of domicile

Region of HE provider

Region of employment

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Chart 5 and Table A displays a number of sankey charts filterable by region. This printout contains only the default chart displaying the North East region.

 

SFR245: Chart 5 - UK domiciled higher education leavers in work in the UK by region of domicile, region of HE provider and region of employment 2015/16

 

 

      

 

      

Table A - UK domiciled higher education leavers in work in the UK by region of domicile, region of HE provider and region of employment 2015/16

 

      

 

Standard Occupational Classification and professional employment

In 2015/16, of the full-time first degree leavers who were employed in the UK, 71% were in posts classified as professional employment, the same percentage as in 2014/15. The remaining 29% were working in occupational groups classed as non-professional. Sales and customer service occupations accounted for 10% of all leavers in employment, the largest group in the non-professional occupations, see Table 7. The DLHE survey gives an early indication of the occupations into which leavers are entering. These occupations may change over the leavers' careers, further information on progression is presented in the results of the Longitudinal DLHE survey which follows up leavers 3 years later. A free publication on the Longitudinal Survey for 2012/13 graduates will be published on 10 August 2017.

Chart 6 shows the median salaries of UK domiciled full-time first degree leavers who were employed in the UK, split by professional and non-professional occupations. Across all subjects studied by these leavers, those in professional employment have higher median salaries than those in non-professional employment. Excluding Medicine & dentistry and Veterinary science, who have too few leavers in non-professional employment to calculate median salaries, the largest difference between median salaries can be seen among leavers who studied Engineering & technology, with those in professional employment earning a median salary of £26,000 compared with those in non-professional employment earning £16,500. The smallest difference is seen in both Law and Mass communications & documentation, in which there is only a £2,000 gap between leavers in professional and non-professional employment.

 

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Median salary of UK domiciled full-time leavers who obtained first degree qualifications and entered full-time paid work in the UK by subject area and professional/non-professional marker 2015/16

 

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SFR245: Chart 6 - Median salary of UK domiciled full-time leavers who obtained first degree qualifications and entered full-time paid work in the UK by subject area and occupational classification 2015/16

 

Chart 7 presents the percentage of UK domiciled leavers in UK employment in professional occupations by subject area and sex. Overall, males have a higher percentage in professional occupations than females across all subjects except Subjects allied to medicine, Engineering & technology and Architecture, building & planning. Due to the large number of leavers in the Subjects allied to medicine area, across science subject areas females have a higher percentage of leavers in professional occupations (83%) compared to males (81%).

 

      

 
 

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Percentage of UK domiciled leavers in professional occupations by subject area and sex 2015/16

 

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SFR245: Chart 7 - Percentage of UK domiciled leavers in professional occupations by subject area and sex 2015/16

 

Subject

In 2015/16, the activities of full-time first degree leavers varied between subjects. Those who studied Law, Physical sciences and Historical & philosophical studies had the highest percentages of leavers in further study, compared with Veterinary science, Medicine & dentistry and Subjects allied to medicine who had the least percentage of leavers in further study, but the highest percentage in work.

In relation to full-time first degree leavers who were unemployed, the highest percentages were among those who studied Computer science, Mass communications & documentation, Mathematical sciences, Physical sciences and Engineering & technology. For Science subject areas, 69% of full-time first degree leavers were in employment and 5% were unemployed. For other subject areas 66% were in employment and 6% were unemployed, see Table 6a.

There were variations by subject in the industries of full-time first degree graduates who were employed in the UK. Of those with known Standard Industrial Classification who studied Education, 74% were in the Education industry. Of those who studied Computer science, 42% were in the Information and communication industry. In contrast, of those who studied Creative arts & design, just 14% were in the Arts, entertainment and recreation industry. Of those who studied Agriculture & related subjects, 14% were in the Agriculture, forestry and fishing industry, see Table 8.


Destinations of leavers data broken down by region

Use the buttons below to display data about the region that interests you the most.

Key points (England only)

In 2015/16, 67% of leavers from HE providers in England were in UK employment (compared with 68% in 2014/15), 3% were employed overseas, 6% were in work & further study, 4% were engaged in other activities, and 5% were unemployed. In 2015/16, 15% were in further study compared to 13% in 2014/15, see Table 4b , Table 5b and Chart 8.

In 2015/16, there were 199,795 full-time first degree leavers whose destinations were known. Of these, 65% were in UK employment, compared to 68% in 2014/15. In 2015/16, 17% were in further study compared to 14% in 2014/15, see Table 4b and Chart 8.

For Science subject areas 68% of full-time first degree leavers were in UK employment and 5% were unemployed. For other subject areas 63% were in UK employment and 6% were unemployed. 17% were in further study, regardless of the subject they had studied, see Table 6b.

In 2015/16, of the full-time first degree leavers who were employed in the UK, 71% were in posts classified as professional employment. The remaining 29% were working in occupational groups classified as non-professional, see Table 7.

In 2015/16, of the part-time first degree leavers whose destinations were known, 71% were in UK employment (compared with 74% in 2014/15).  5% were unemployed, and 7% were in further study, see Table 5b and Chart 8.

Chart 8 shows the percentages of leavers in each destination by level and mode of qualification obtained.

 

SFR245: Chart 8 - Destinations of UK and other EU domiciled leavers from HE providers in England 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

Key points (Wales only)

In 2015/16, 66% of leavers from HE providers in Wales were in UK employment (compared with 67% in 2014/15), 3% were employed overseas, 7% were in work & further study, 4% were engaged in other activities, and 5% were unemployed. In 2015/16, 16% were in further study compared to 13% in 2014/15, see Table 4b , Table 5b and Chart 8.

In 2015/16, there were 13,175 full-time first degree leavers whose destinations were known. Of these, 64% were in UK employment, compared to 65% in 2014/15. In 2015/16, 19% were in further study compared to 16% in 2014/15, see Table 4b and Chart 8.

For Science subject areas 65% of full-time first degree leavers were in UK employment, 5% were unemployed and 20% were in further study. For other subject areas 63% were in UK employment, 5% were unemployed and 18% were in further study, see Table 6b.

In 2015/16, of the full-time first degree leavers who were employed in the UK, 64% were in posts classified as professional employment, an increase from 61% in 2014/15. The remaining 36% were working in occupational groups classified as non-professional, see Table 7.

In 2015/16, of the part-time first degree leavers whose destinations were known, 74% were in UK employment (the same as in 2014/15).  3% were unemployed, and 6% were in further study, see Table 5b and Chart 8.

Chart 8 shows the percentages of leavers in each destination by level and mode of qualification obtained.

 

SFR245: Chart 8 - Destinations of UK and other EU domiciled leavers from HE providers in Wales 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

Key points (Scotland only)

In 2015/16, 65% of leavers from HE providers in Scotland were in UK employment (the same percentage as in 2014/15), 5% were employed overseas, 6% were in work & further study, 4% were engaged in other activities, and 5% were unemployed. In 2015/16, 16% were in further study compared to 15% in 2014/15, see Table 4b , Table 5b and Chart 8.

In 2015/16, there were 21,305 full-time first degree leavers whose destinations were known. Of these, 64% were in UK employment, compared to 65% in 2014/15. 19% were in further study compared to 17% in 2014/15, see Table 4b and Chart 8.

For Science subject areas 66% of full-time first degree leavers were in UK employment, 4% were unemployed and 19% were in further study. For other subject areas 61% were in UK employment, 5% were unemployed and 19% were in further study, see Table 6b.

In 2015/16, of the full-time first degree leavers who were employed in the UK, 72% were in posts classified as professional employment (the same as in 2014/15). The remaining 28% were working in occupational groups classified as non-professional, see Table 7.

In 2015/16, of the part-time first degree leavers whose destinations were known, 74% were in UK employment, compared with 75% in 2014/15.  3% were unemployed, and 7% were in further study, see Table 5b and Chart 8.

Chart 8 shows the percentages of leavers in each destination by level and mode of qualification obtained.

 

SFR245: Chart 8 - Destinations of UK and other EU domiciled leavers from HE providers in Scogtland 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

Key points (Northern Ireland only)

In 2015/16, 69% of leavers from HE providers in Northern Ireland were in UK employment (the same as in 2014/15), 6% were employed overseas, 5% were in work & further study, 4% were engaged in other activities, and 5% were unemployed. In 2015/16, 10% were in further study compared to 11% in 2014/15, see Table 4b , Table 5b and Chart 8.

In 2015/16, there were 6,455 full-time first degree leavers whose destinations were known. Of these, 69% were in UK employment, compared to 67% in 2014/15. 13% were in further study (the same percentage as in 2014/15), see Table 4b and Chart 8.

For Science subject areas 72% of full-time first degree leavers were in UK employment, 5% were unemployed and 12% were in further study. For other subject areas 65% were in employment, 6% were unemployed and 14% were in further study, see Table 6b.

In 2015/16, of the full-time first degree leavers who were employed in the UK, 72% were in posts classified as professional employment (an increase from 71% in 2014/15). The remaining 28% were working in occupational groups classified as non-professional, see Table 7.

In 2015/16, of the part-time first degree leavers whose destinations were known, 69% were in UK employment, compared with 70% in 2014/15. 6% were unemployed, and 7% were in further study, see Table 5b and Chart 8.

Chart 8 shows the percentages of leavers in each destination by level and mode of qualification obtained.

 

SFR245: Chart 8 - Destinations of UK and other EU domiciled leavers from HE providers in Northern Ireland 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

 

      

 
 

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Destinations of UK and other EU domiciled leavers from HE providers in England 2011/12 to 2015/16

 

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In 2015/16, of other undergraduate (excluding foundation degree) leavers whose destinations were known, 62% were in UK employment. In contrast, 74% of doctorates and 74% of other postgraduate leavers were in UK employment. A further 11% of doctorate leavers, and 7% of other postgraduate leavers were working overseas, see Table 4b , Table 5b and Chart 8.

In 2015/16, of those UK domiciled, first degree leavers reported as being in full-time paid employment in the UK, 73% disclosed their salary. The median salary reported (to the nearest £500) was £21,500, the lower quartile was £17,500 and the upper quartile £25,000. The mean salary was £22,500, see Table 9.

In 2015/16, of other undergraduate (excluding foundation degree) leavers whose destinations were known, 60% were in UK employment. In contrast, 74% of doctorates and 76% of other postgraduates were in UK employment. A further 10% of doctorate leavers, and 4% of other postgraduate leavers were working overseas, see Table 4b , Table 5b and Chart 8.

In 2015/16, of those UK domiciled, first degree leavers reported as being in full-time paid employment in the UK, 72% disclosed their salary. The median salary reported (to the nearest £500) was £20,000, the lower quartile was £16,000 and the upper quartile £24,000. The mean salary was £21,000, see Table 9.

In 2015/16, of other undergraduate (excluding foundation degree) leavers whose destinations were known, 46% were in UK employment. In contrast, 72% of doctorates and 72% of other postgraduates were in UK employment. A further 13% of doctorate leavers, and 10% of other postgraduate leavers were working overseas, see Table 4b , Table 5b and Chart 8.

In 2015/16, of those UK domiciled, first degree leavers reported as being in full-time paid employment in the UK, 65% disclosed their salary. The median salary reported (to the nearest £500) was £22,000, the lower quartile was £18,500 and the upper quartile £26,000. The mean salary was £23,500, see Table 9.

In 2015/16, of other undergraduate (excluding foundation degree) leavers whose destinations were known, 64% were in UK employment. In the same year, 64% of doctorates and 75% of other postgraduates were in UK employment. A further 22% of doctorate leavers, and 10% of other postgraduate leavers were working overseas, see Table 4b , Table 5b and Chart 8.

In 2015/16, of those UK domiciled, first degree leavers reported as being in full-time paid employment in the UK, 64% disclosed their salary. The median salary reported (to the nearest £500) was £21,000, the lower quartile was £16,000 and the upper quartile £24,000. The mean salary was £21,000, see Table 9.


Tables

Table 1 - Destinations of leavers by mode of qualification, domicile and activity 2015/16

Table 2 - Destinations of leavers by mode, activity, sex, age group, disability status and ethnicity 2015/16

Table 3 - Destinations of leavers by sex, activity and level of qualification obtained 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 4a - Destinations of full-time leavers by sex, activity and level of qualification obtained 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 4b - Destinations of full-time leavers by location of HE provider, activity and level of qualification obtained 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 5a - Destinations of part-time leavers by sex, activity and level of qualification obtained 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 5b - Destinations of part-time leavers by location of HE provider, activity and level of qualification obtained 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 6a - Destinations of full-time first degree leavers by sex, activity and subject area 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 6b - Destinations of full-time first degree leavers by location of HE provider, activity and subject area 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 7 - Occupation of full-time first degree leavers entering employment in the UK by location of HE provider and subject area of degree 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 8 - Industry of full-time first degree leavers entering employment in the UK by location of HE provider and subject area of degree 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 9 - UK domiciled leavers who obtained first degree qualifications and entered full-time paid work in the UK by location of HE provider, mode of study, sex and salary 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 10 - UK domiciled full-time leavers who obtained first degree qualifications and entered full-time paid work in the UK by subject area, location of HE provider, sex and salary 2015/16

Table 11 - Full-time UK domiciled leavers who entered employment within the UK by location of study, level of qualification obtained and location of employment 2011/12 to 2015/16

Table 12 - Full-time UK domiciled leavers who entered employment within the UK by domicile, level of qualification obtained and location of employment 2011/12 to 2015/16

Download all tables


Notes and frequently asked questions

Who produced this Statistical First Release?

This SFR has been produced by HESA in collaboration with statisticians from the Department for Education, the Welsh Government, the Scottish Government and the Department for the Economy Northern Ireland. It has been released according to the arrangements approved by the UK Statistics Authority.

What populations are excluded from this SFR?

Non-EU leavers were added to the target population from 2011/12. There were 141,340 non-EU leavers in the target population in 2015/16, compared with 140,320 in 2014/15. Of those in the 2015/16 non-EU target population, 47,800 responded, an overall response rate of 34% (the same percentage as in 2014/15). Response rates vary across the sector, and within different activities. As a result, there could be bias in the non-EU data, and so the data for these leavers are excluded from the SFR. 

UK and other EU leavers who obtained postgraduate research qualifications from dormant status are also excluded from this SFR as the destination outcomes of these leavers are considered to be materially different in nature to the outcomes of the other postgraduate research leavers included in the survey.

Are there any notable changes in the DLHE survey over the timeseries in this SFR?

In 2014/15, the questions asked to ascertain salary information from leavers changed. Whereas previously leavers were asked for their annual salary, from 2014/15 they were able to report their salary in one of a variety of time-frames (e.g. annually, monthly, weekly, hourly). HESA use this information (alongside the leavers' reported number of hours worked) to calculate an annual salary for each leaver. While this was a positive change to the survey, allowing for greater accuracy for leavers who only know their hourly or weekly salary, data quality issues were noticed. Investigations into the 2014/15 data reveal that some leavers have quite likely reported a salary against an incorrect time-frame. A possible example of this is a leaver reporting a true annual salary of £25,000, yet being paid in monthly blocks and inaccurately reporting this as a monthly salary. HESA would then multiply the £25,000 by 12 to report an incorrect annual salary of £300,000. Instances of these types of inaccuracies are very low, and data investigations reveal the overall impact on average salary within this SFR is low. The decision was therefore taken to include all responses within average salary calculations.

How have the figures in the text been calculated?

Figures quoted throughout this SFR have been derived from the Excel tables (these can be found above). Comparisons with previous year's data have only been included where they can be derived from these tables.

How to use the charts

Some of the charts within this SFR are interactive. Those that are have an option immediately above the chart to filter by particular data field(s) such as by first year marker or mode of study. The charts react to whichever option is chosen, changing the data accordingly. The title of the chart also changes to describe exactly what data is displayed. To aid interpretation of the charts, it is possible to hover over any of the given data points to read exact figures. To see all the data behind a chart, there is an option just below each chart to ‘Get the data’. All the figures used within that chart are displayed in csv format.

In the data behind the charts, 0, 1, 2 are rounded to 0. All other numbers are rounded up or down to the nearest multiple of 5. Percentages are calculated on unrounded data and are rounded to the nearest whole number. This means percentages may not sum exactly to 100%. Salary data is rounded to the nearest £500.

How to view a printable version of this SFR

There is an option at the top of the page to 'View a printable version of this SFR'. Clicking that will turn all the interactive charts into static images, and you can then print the page in the same way you would any other webpage. If you want to return to viewing interactive charts, you will need to refresh the page.

How to find information about England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland

In addition to interactive charts, this SFR allows interaction on the section describing ‘Destinations of leavers data broken down by region’. The option is given to choose information for England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland. Once chosen, the text and charts beneath adjust for that particular country. The charts within this section are also interactive.

How are Open University students counted?

As in the 2014/15 SFR, enrolments and qualifications registered at one of The Open University's (OU) national centres in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland will contribute to the totals of those countries where statistics are shown by country of HE provider. Please note that all non-UK domiciled OU students, those who study at postgraduate research level, and students returned in the Aggregate offshore record, are registered to the OU administrative centre in England. 

National Statistics

The United Kingdom Statistics Authority has designated these statistics as National Statistics, in accordance with the Statistics and Registration Service Act 2007 and signifying compliance with the Code of Practice for Official Statistics.

Designation can be broadly interpreted to mean that the statistics:

  • Meet identified user needs
  • Are well explained and readily accessible
  • Are produced according to sound methods, and
  • Are managed impartially and objectively in the public interest.

Once statistics have been designated as National Statistics it is a statutory requirement that the Code of Practice shall continue to be observed.

Where can I find more detail on the destinations of leavers?

Our Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education 2015/16 publication providing more detailed information about the destinations of leavers from higher education will be published by HESA on 20 July 2017.

What is the future of Destinations data?

We have conducted a major review of the data we collect about the destinations and outcomes of graduates. This has led to the formulation of the new Graduate Outcomes survey which will provide more comprehensive data that reflects recent changes in the HE sector and the graduate labour market. The first Graduate Outcomes data is due to be published in January 2020.

Our existing destinations data remains a vital source for understanding higher education outcomes. We will be publishing further destinations data this year (including our DLHE publication), and anticipate that next year will mark our final DLHE outputs.


Definitions

The data presented in this SFR is based on the 2015/16 HESA Destinations of Leavers and Student records. The statistics in this SFR are derived by HESA from data collected from all publicly funded HE providers in the UK (including The Open University) and the University of Buckingham, which is privately funded. The figures therefore exclude HE leavers from UK further education colleges and from other private and independent UK HE providers.

Destinations of Leavers data was prepared in June 2017 using the following versions of the datasets:

  • 2011/12 Fixed Student dataset, September 2014 version
  • 2011/12 Fixed Destinations of Leavers dataset, June 2015 version
  • 2012/13 Fixed Student dataset, September 2016 version
  • 2012/13 Original Destinations of Leavers dataset, May 2014 version
  • 2013/14 Original Student dataset, February 2015 version
  • 2013/14 Fixed Destinations of Leavers dataset, March 2016 version
  • 2014/15 Original Student dataset, May 2016 version
  • 2014/15 Fixed Destinations of Leavers dataset, January 2017 version
  • 2015/16 Original Student dataset, November 2016 version
  • 2015/16 Original Destinations of Leavers dataset, May 2017 version

We also publish a full set of definitions relating to the data. These include:

For data intelligence, please see the data intelligence web page.

Press enquiries should be directed to the Press Office at HESA, 95 Promenade, Cheltenham, GL50 1HZ, +44 (0)1242 211120, [email protected]. General enquiries about the data contained within this SFR should be addressed to Rebecca Haslam, Senior Information Analyst, HESA (at the same address), +44 (0)1242 211133, [email protected].

Ends

National Statistic

Embargo

29 June 2017, 9:30

Coverage

UK

Themes

Children, education and skills

Issued by

HESA, 95 Promenade, Cheltenham, GL50 1HZ

Press Enquiries

01242 211120

Public Enquiries

01242 211133

Statistician

Rebecca Haslam

Email

[email protected]


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